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If I want to just test a block of Java code, is there a way to run it without putting it in a function?

Public static void main(String[] args){
//block of code
}

Also, how do I execute a static block of code like below?

static {
//block of code
}
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1) I'm not aware of such. 2) static block is executed once, when class it is located in is first loaded. –  Andrew Logvinov Jan 31 '13 at 6:43
    
This question is one of the reasons I love groovy. Type your java snippet and run as a groovy script... most of the time it will just work. –  Michael Rutherfurd Feb 1 '13 at 2:21
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can create static blocks

public class StackOverflowUser {
    public static StackOverflowUser god;
    static {
        god = new StackOverflowUser("Jon Skeet");
    }
    //Stoof
}

Which will do something (hopefully) at some point during the program's life span. The truth is, there's no telling when it fires, and it's not well documented and may change from JVM to JVM. It will definitely have fired before you make the first call to that class, but it could have been executed any time between right before your call and JVM init.

You can also create just constructor blocks

public class StackOverflowUser {
    private static ArrayList<StackOverflowUser> users = new ArrayList<StackOverflowUser>();
    {
        users.add(this);
    }
    //Stoof
}

This will activate before the constructor is called, right before. Basically, right after object creation, but before initialization. Don't try messing with too many fields, because they won't have been set.

In terms of order, all blocks work the same way. Once the first block has been called, the second block, third block, etc. will all follow, as Jayan puts it "in textual order".

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@ Ryan Amos: Static blocks are executed in textual order : stackoverflow.com/questions/3028219/… –  Jayan Jan 31 '13 at 6:55
    
@Jayan As to when they're actually run, first class reference, class load, I've always heard that it's unreliable. I will clarify that, though, thanks. –  Ryan Amos Jan 31 '13 at 6:57
    
True. They run when class is loaded, so practically unreliable. –  Jayan Jan 31 '13 at 7:00
    
Section 12.4 of JLS specifies exactly when it happens: docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-12.html#jls-12.4 –  jackrabbit Jan 31 '13 at 7:04
    
Static blocks are reliable in that they will have been executed before any instance of the class is instantiated, or accessed statically from elsewhere. So if you want to ensure the static blocks are executed before a specific point in your code, then all you need to do is reference the class. –  SimonC Jan 31 '13 at 7:06
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Static blocks get executed once the class is loaded or initialized. So if you want to test the code inside the static block, the best way is to create an instance of the class.

if you want to test your code the best way is to use some testing framework like JUnit or testng.

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  1. static block will be executed when your class is being loaded first. So it can be used for DB instantiation etc. where you are sure that this block will be executed before your other code run.
  2. simple block {...} will run when you try to create an instance. Here first this block will be called then the code written below your line containing new keyword will be called.
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public class Test3 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test3 obj = new Test3();

    }   
    {
        System.out.println("hussain akhtar wahid");
    }
}
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    public class StaticBlockTest {

    /*
     * Some Code Goes Here 
     * 
     * */
    static {

        System.out.println(" Static Block Executed ");
        System.exit(0);
    }


}

Static block gets executed without the need for the main method and you need to pass the System.exit(0) to terminate the currently running Java Virtual Machine to exit the program execution.

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