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Suppose you want to read the data from large text file (~300mb) to array of vectors: vector<string> *Data (assume that the number of columns is known).

//file is opened with ifstream; initial value of s is set up, etc...


Data = new vector<string>[col];
string u;
int i = 0;

do
{       
    istringstream iLine = istringstream(s);

    i=0;
    while(iLine >> u)
    {
        Data[i].push_back(u);
        i++;
    }
}
while(getline(file, s));

This code works fine for small files (<50mb) but memory usage is increasing exponentially when reading large file. I'm pretty sure that the problem is in creating istringstream objects each time in a loop. However, defining istringstream iLine; outside of both loops and putting each string into stream by iLine.str(s); and clearing the stream after inner while-loop (iLine.str(""); iLine.clear();) causes the same order of memory explosion as well. The questions that arise:

  1. why istringstream behaves this way;
  2. if it is the intended behavior, how the above task can be accomplished?

Thank you

EDIT: In regards to the 1st answer I do clean the memory allocated by array later in the code:

for(long i=0;i<col;i++)
    Data[i].clear();
delete []Data;

FULL COMPILE-READY CODE (add headers):

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
ofstream testfile;
testfile.open("testdata.txt");

srand(time(NULL));

for(int i = 1; i<1000000; i++)
{
    for(int j=1; j<100; j++)
    {
        testfile << rand()%100 << " ";
    }

    testfile << endl;
}

testfile.close();

vector<string> *Data;

clock_t begin = clock();

ifstream file("testdata.txt"); 

string s;

getline(file,s);

istringstream iss = istringstream(s);

string nums;

int col=0;

while(iss >> nums)
{
    col++;
}

cout << "Columns #: " << col << endl;

Data = new vector<string>[col];

string u;
int i = 0;

do
{

    istringstream iLine = istringstream(s);

    i=0;

    while(iLine >> u)
    {
        Data[i].push_back(u);
        i++;

    }

}
while(getline(file, s));

cout << "Rows #: " << Data[0].size() << endl;

for(long i=0;i<col;i++)
        Data[i].clear();
    delete []Data;

clock_t end = clock();

double elapsed_secs = double(end - begin) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

cout << elapsed_secs << endl;

getchar();
return 0;
}
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2  
The real question is why are you using a separate vector for each line?! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '13 at 6:53
    
Why aren't you just using your ifstream ? –  WhozCraig Jan 31 '13 at 6:54
1  
Why are you newing your vector? –  Mark Garcia Jan 31 '13 at 6:55
    
1. I use separate vector for each COLUMN. The behavior reading row-wise is similar (I've checked) –  user2028058 Jan 31 '13 at 6:57
    
I think an even realer (is that a word?) question is, since you are using vector, which is a replacement for manually managing dynamic arrays, why are you making a dynamic array of vectors instead of a vector of vectors? –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 31 '13 at 6:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

vector<> grows memory geometrically. A typical pattern would be that it doubles the capacity whenever it needs to grow. That may leave a lot of extra space allocated but unused, if your loop ends right after such a threshold. You could try calling shrink_to_fit() on each vector when you are done.

Additionally, memory allocated by the C++ allocators (or even plain malloc()) is often not returned to the OS, but left in a process-internal free memory pool. this may lead to further apparent growth. And it may cause the results of shrink_to_fit() to be invisible from outside the process.

Finally if you have lots of small strings ("2-digit numbers"), the overhead of a stringobject may be considerable. Even if the implementation uses a small-string optimization, I'd assume that a typical string uses no less than 16 or 24 bytes (size, capacity, data pointer or small string buffer) - probably more on a platform where size_type is 64 bits. That is a lot of memory for 3 bytes of payload.

So I assume you are seeing normal behaviour of vector<>

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Hm.. This really makes sense for me, but: 1. The memory grows so fast that exception raised before loop is done, so I cannot shrink the size of vector 2. 2-digit numbers are just for example. I need to handle any input atomic type –  user2028058 Jan 31 '13 at 7:22
2  
With your test code, does it change anything (fail sooner, fail later, fail never), if you call Data[i].reserve(1000000); for each vector. (Taking advantage of the fact that you know that you'll have 999999 lines of input.) –  JoergB Jan 31 '13 at 7:37
    
Yes, you are right... it fails even on the stage of allocating this much memory for all the vectors... Do you know the alternative solution for my task? –  user2028058 Jan 31 '13 at 7:54
    
The most efficient use of memory would be to load all the file content into an array of chars and use something equivalent to strtok() to break it into words in place. Your column vectors would then be vector<const char *>. That is assuming you need all the data in memory in text form at once. –  JoergB Jan 31 '13 at 7:59
    
@user2028058: That depends upon what your task is. Reading data into memory is certainly not the task, but a means to an end. So what exactly are you trying to do with the data? –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 31 '13 at 8:00

I seriously suspect this is not istringstream problem (especially, given you have same result with iLine constructor outside the loop).

Possibly, this is a normal behavior of the std::vector. To test that, how about you run the exact same lines, but comment out: Data[i].push_back(u);. See if your memory grows this way. If it doesn't then you know where the problem is..

Depends on your library, vector::push_back will expand its capacity by a factor of 1.5 (Microsoft) or 2 (glib) every time it needs more room.

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