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Is there a consensus of preference between these two programming approaches? Could you please explain to me why, on pros`cons scale, for your chosen paradigm.

(i) A program has three functions that needs to be enacted on some input. It runs the first, gets a returned variable, runs the second with that variable and then does the same for the third. Finally printing the third's returned variable.

func1(){ return f1 }
func2(){ return f2 }
func3(){ return f3 }
main(){
fin=# of inputs
i=0
while i<fin
   first=func1(in[i])
   sec=func2(first)
   third=func3(sec)
   print(third)
   i++
}  

(ii) A program steps through a series of instructions, initially pushing the first domino from the main function.

func1(){ func2(newfrom1) }
func2(){ func3(newfrom2) }
func3(){ print(newfrom3) }
main(){
fin=# of inputs
i=0
while i<fin
   func1(in[i])
   i++
} 
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2 Answers

The only difference I see is that version 2 uses variables to store intermediate results.
So from a performance point of view, there should not be any difference, since a compiler would store these intermediate results in both versions in registers. But this can be checked by profiling.
But to me version 1 is more readable, and thus better.

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The first approach is more reusable - what if you want to do whatever it is that func1 does to something else later on, but you don't then want to do func2 and func3 on it? If func1 was written to call those for the first scenario then you have to go and change everything.

My preference is to try to identify 'operations' that make sense for a single function to do, write a function to do that, then for more complex things write another function which calls several of the smaller ones to achieve its ends. One then often finds some of those smaller functions find use elsewhere at a later date.

Yes this leaves me with more function calls, and possibly more temporary storage being used, but I let the compiler worry about that - if it proves to be a performance issue I'll deal with it then. Usually performance is hurt by other things though.

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