Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Lately I found myself relying on custom [Attributes] allot. I'm on a quest for creating RTTI and Generics based variants of the VCL controls I most often use; My intention is to reduce the amount of boilerplate code to a minimum, and I find RTTI, Anonymous methods and Attributes to be awesome.

I've got an unusual problem. Since I end up using lots of [Attributes], I need a readable way to format this code. Might sound like an insignificant problem but I'm very obsessive with my formatting and indenting. The problem with attributes is that they're not formatted in a special way by the IDE. In a block of multiple field declarations, inter-wind with [Attribute] declarations, you'd have a hard time guessing what's a type, what's an attribute, what attribute applies to what field. Here's a minimal example:

type
  [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
  TSomething = class
  public
    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    FieldName: string;
    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    OtherField: Integer;
    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    function Sum(a,b:Integer):Currency;
    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    property Name:string read FieldName write FieldName;
  end;

The way I formated those [Attributes] in the example above is the way most often seen in C# code; Unfortunately I have seen no example of Delphi code using attributes, except my own. This works slightly better for C# because you're less likely to apply attributes to actual fields and more likely to apply them to properties or functions; Since in C# the function implementation immediately follows it's declaration (the same for properties) you don't get the same kind of block as with Delphi; functions and property declarations are naturally separated so glancing over the code is not hindered by the use of attributes.

I tried the obvious source for delphi-related "style" information. The code formater in Delphi 2010 doesn't understand property declarations at all! In the above example, if I remove the public keyword and run the built-in code formater then the first line of Attributes declarations is moved one line up behind the class keyword as if it's declaring an ancestor class.

I grepped around the Delphi 2010 source code. Either my grep-fu is failing me badly or there's absolutely no use of attributes in the whole of the Delphi 2010 sources. Just to be clear, after trying to grep for the actual uses of attributes (difficult because square brackets are used allot and they rarely mean it's an attribute declaration) I started grepping for TCustomAttribute: there's no descendant of TCustomAttribute anywhere, so obviously there's no use of attributes.

Finaly to the question:

How do you format [Attributes] for readability?

My latest solution looks like this:

type
 [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
  TSomething = class
  public
   [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    FieldName: string;
   [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    OtherField: Integer;
   [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    function Sum(a,b:Integer):Currency;
   [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    property Name:string read FieldName write FieldName;
  end;

I'm normally using two-column indent; For attributes I'm thinking of moving the attribute declaration one-to-the-left; There's always space for that since my types, fields, methods and properties always have a minimum of 2 columns right-indent (for types) or 4 for class members. Left-indenting like seems to blend nicely with existing declarations that do not use attributes, and I want the attributes to "stand out", so left indent is better then right indent.

What do you think? Have you got better ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
I use the first version and just add blank lines after each. And optionally two blank lines after a group of those attribute/method-property pairs for "functional separation". Needs more screen real estate, but it helps... –  Marjan Venema Jan 31 '13 at 7:54
    
@MarjanVenema, thank you, I also did that but I'm not very happy with it because it's so sparse. Not only wastes screen space but also dilutes information. It's an option those, and maybe a better standard then my option. Maybe you'd consider posting this as an answer so I can vote it up. I guess I'd also like to get the a sense of the community's preference: other people need to read (and write) code using whatever standard I'm going to select, I don't want to make this just about me. –  Cosmin Prund Jan 31 '13 at 8:24
    
Isn't this a perfect fit for "not constructive" close votes? –  David Heffernan Jan 31 '13 at 8:30
    
@DavidHeffernan: maybe, as it sollicites opinion, but it is very specific. –  Marjan Venema Jan 31 '13 at 8:30
    
@CosminPrund: Thanks, done. –  Marjan Venema Jan 31 '13 at 8:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

An answer as per request.

I use the first version and just add blank lines after each. And optionally two blank lines after a group of those attribute/method-property pairs for "functional separation". I have also been known to repeat the visibility specifier to separate functional groups of methods/properties.

It needs more screen real estate, but it helps..

type
  [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
  TSomething = class
  public
    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    FieldName: string;

    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    OtherField: Integer;

    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    function Sum(a,b:Integer):Currency;

    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    property Name:string read FieldName write FieldName;

  public
    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    TableName: string;

    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    OtherTable: Integer;

    [OneAttribute('SomeParam', 7), AnOtherAttribute]
    function TableSum(a,b:Integer):Currency;
  end;
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 This absolutely helps in terms of readability –  whosrdaddy Jan 31 '13 at 8:43
    
+1, it's an option. I especially like the two public sections, I end up doing that allot (mostly in the private area). My issue with this solution is that it's very sparse and dilutes content. When you have 5 type declarations one after the other, with many-many fields, it all gets a little blurry. –  Cosmin Prund Jan 31 '13 at 9:00
    
@CosminPrund: yes that is my peeve with it as well, but I haven't as yet found another way. Your second version is an option as well, but is a little too "jumpy" (with regard to indentation) for me. –  Marjan Venema Jan 31 '13 at 9:09
2  
@MarjanVenema, I wish the IDE would color the Attribute declarations in some other way; Like the compilere-directives are colored distinctly from comments. That would really help. –  Cosmin Prund Jan 31 '13 at 9:21
1  
@StefanGlienke, I also don't put multiple fields of the same type on a single line, but attributes are different: they all apply to the next declaration, they're not independent in the way fields are. And in fact some of them are logically related and might not even make sense all by themselves. I'm not judging your preference, I just want to know if there's more to it then just personal preference. –  Cosmin Prund Jan 31 '13 at 11:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.