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Declaring and initializing a variable in a Conditional or Control statement in C++

Instead of this...

int value = get_value();
if ( value > 100 )
{
    // Do something with value.
}

... is it possible to reduce the scope of value to only where it is needed:

if ( int value = get_value() > 100 )
{
    // Obviously this doesn't work. get_value() > 100 returns true,
    // which is implicitly converted to 1 and assigned to value.
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Lightness Races in Orbit, BЈовић, alxx, Aleksander Blomskøld, Tom van Enckevort Jan 31 '13 at 8:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Can't you just do if(get_value() > 100) ? –  noko Jan 31 '13 at 7:53
1  
@noko: Not if you want to do something with the value. –  Mike Seymour Jan 31 '13 at 7:53
    
Can you explain this a little bit more? What are you trying to do exactly? –  noko Jan 31 '13 at 7:55
3  
@MayankSharma: I think not. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '13 at 8:08
2  
@MayankSharma: Actually, that's not what you said! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '13 at 8:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

If you want specific scope for value, you can introduce a scope block.

#include <iostream>

int get_value() {
    return 101;
}

int main() {
    {
        int value = get_value();
        if(value > 100)
            std::cout << "Hey!";
    } //value out of scope
}
share|improve this answer
    
Weee!!! What a breeze! +1 for the really elegant solution. –  Mark Garcia Jan 31 '13 at 8:00
1  
I was about to add to my original question, as and edit, "Without introducing a scope block" but I guess it's too late now! –  DrTwox Jan 31 '13 at 8:01
    
@DrTwox: If you add that restriction, then the answer is "no". –  Mike Seymour Jan 31 '13 at 8:02
    
@DrTwox: You can still do that! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '13 at 8:03
2  
@PeterWood: Well it's not really is it –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '13 at 8:11

Can you declare a variable and compare it within the if() statement? No.
Can you declare a variable and compare it in such a way that the scope is tightly-bound to the if() block? Yes!


You can either declare a variable:

if (int x = 5) {
   // lol!
}

or you can do things with one:

int x = foo();
if (x == 5) {
   // wahey!
}

You can't do both!


You can cheat a little where the only thing you need to do is compare with true, because the declaration itself evaluates to the value of the new object.

So, if you have:

int foo()
{
   return 0;
}

Then this:

if (int x = foo()) {
    // never reached
}

is equivalent to:

{
   int x = foo();
   if (x) {
       // never reached
   }
}

This final syntax, using a standalone scope block, is also your golden bullet for more complex expressions:

{
   int x = foo();
   if (x > bar()) {
       // wahooza!
   }
}
share|improve this answer

Put it in a function:

void goodName(int value) {
    if(value > 100) {
        // Do something with value.
    }
}

//...
    goodName(get_value());
share|improve this answer

How about using for instead?

for (int value = get_value(); value > 100; value = 0) {
    //...
}

If you want to go C++11 on it, you can use a lambda:

[](int value = get_value()) {
    if (value > 100) {
        //...
        std::cout << "value:" << value;
    }
}();
share|improve this answer
4  
Write-only code. –  Peter Wood Jan 31 '13 at 7:57
1  
Because this is not error-prone or inexpressive at all. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '13 at 7:58
    
I think for (int value = get_value(); value > 100; value = 0) would be a bit better. No need to use break. –  Nawaz Jan 31 '13 at 8:29
    
@Nawaz: Thanks. –  jxh Jan 31 '13 at 8:31
1  
Using a C++ lambda for this is using a hammer where a stapler is needed. Overdoing, I say. –  yumaikas Feb 1 '13 at 14:30

Or you could just add an extra set of braces for a nested scope, although it's not exactly pretty:

{
    int value = get_value();
    if ( value > 100 )
    {
        // Do something with value.
    }   
}
//now value is out of scope
share|improve this answer

You can write a small function which can do the comparison for you and return the value the if comparison returns true, else return 0 to avoid executing the if block:

int greater_than(int right, int left)
{
   return left > right ? left : 0;
}

Then use it as:

if ( int value = greater_than(100, get_value()))
{
      //wow!
}

Or you can use for as other answer said. Or manually put braces to reduce the scope of the variable.

At any rate, I would not write such code in production code.

Don't write code for machines. Write code for humans. Machines will understand anything as long as you follow their grammar; humans understand what is readable to them. So readability should be your priority over unnecessary scoping.

share|improve this answer

In this particular case, you can bodge it:

if (int value = (get_value() > 100 ? get_value() : 0)) {
    ...
}

I don't really recommend it, though. It doesn't work for all possible tests that you might want to perform, and it calls get_value() twice.

share|improve this answer
    
Why not if(get_value() > 100) { int value = get_value(); ....} –  Nawaz Jan 31 '13 at 8:32
    
@Nawaz: because the questioner posed a contrived restriction (i.e. no good reason -- I wouldn't write this in real code and your suggestion is better). In fact, if the number of calls to get_value() doesn't matter then I probably wouldn't assign it to a variable at all, just type get_value() in the body of the loop however many times it's needed :-) –  Steve Jessop Jan 31 '13 at 8:33
    
@SteveJessop: No good reason? Restricting the scope of variables isn't "no good reason" :) –  DrTwox Feb 1 '13 at 4:25
    
@DrTwox: sure, but adding the extra block is the "real" answer I'd have given if it wasn't already mentioned, or if calling get_value() twice is OK then what Nawaz says in the comment above beats this when there is no else clause. Actually Nawaz's answer is a potential improvement on this anyway. I'd tinker a bit with it, I don't love the idea of a function whose first param is called right and the second left! –  Steve Jessop Feb 2 '13 at 8:46

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