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How can I create a dictionary with no duplicate values from a dictionary that may have duplicate values?

IDictionary<string, string> myDict = new Dictionary<string, string>();

myDict.Add("1", "blue");
myDict.Add("2", "blue");
myDict.Add("3", "red");
myDict.Add("4", "green");


uniqueValueDict = myDict.???

Edit:

-I don't care which key is kept. - Is there something using Distinct() operation?

share|improve this question
6  
Which key do you want to keep? "1", "2", or none? – dtb Sep 22 '09 at 19:30
    
I think you need to give more information about the behavior of the unique-making function. For blue, which key should it keep, 1 or 2? – Tesserex Sep 22 '09 at 19:31
    
up vote 38 down vote accepted

What do you want to do with the duplicates? If you don't mind which key you lose, just build another dictionary like this:

IDictionary<string, string> myDict = new Dictionary<string, string>();

myDict.Add("1", "blue");
myDict.Add("2", "blue");
myDict.Add("3", "red");
myDict.Add("4", "green");

HashSet<string> knownValues = new HashSet<string>();
Dictionary<string, string> uniqueValues = new Dictionary<string, string>();

foreach (var pair in myDict)
{
    if (knownValues.Add(pair.Value))
    {
        uniqueValues.Add(pair.Key, pair.Value);
    }
}

That assumes you're using .NET 3.5, admittedly. Let me know if you need a .NET 2.0 solution.

Here's a LINQ-based solution which I find pleasantly compact...

var uniqueValues = myDict.GroupBy(pair => pair.Value)
                         .Select(group => group.First())
                         .ToDictionary(pair => pair.Key, pair => pair.Value);
share|improve this answer
    
Wow Jon, you almost broke the 100K mark :-) – Eric J. Sep 22 '09 at 19:37
9  
Little does he know after 100K it loops back to 0, ruuhaha – SwDevMan81 Sep 22 '09 at 20:28
    
Thanks. The linq solution is what I was looking for. Curious could you somehow use the Distinct extension method? – User Sep 22 '09 at 20:55
    
@User: I don't think Distinct would help in this case... DistinctBy from MoreLINQ would though. – Jon Skeet Sep 22 '09 at 21:27
    
The LINQ method does not work in all situtions. Some dictionary sets do not allow you to call the .GroupBy() method. – Mitchell Skurnik Oct 14 '10 at 17:29

The brute-force solution would be something like the following

var result = dictionary
    .GroupBy(kvp => kvp.Value)
    .ToDictionary(grp => grp.First().Value, grp.Key)

assuming you don't really care about the key used to represent a group of duplicates and it is acceptable to rebuild the dictionary.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried to imagine linq-like solution but didn't have VS at my fingertips. +1 for materializing this approach ;-) – queen3 Sep 22 '09 at 19:38
    
I am not sure if it even compiles ... just going to fire up VS and test it... – Daniel Brückner Sep 22 '09 at 19:39
    
Didn't compile because I missed .Value after the First() call, but fixed it. – Daniel Brückner Sep 22 '09 at 19:44
    
This didn't work for me. It created a dictionary with the "value" as both the key and the value. – User Sep 22 '09 at 20:53

Jon beat me to the .NET 3.5 solution, but this should work if you need a .NET 2.0 solution:

        List<string> vals = new List<string>();
        Dictionary<string, string> newDict = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        foreach (KeyValuePair<string, string> item in myDict)
        {
            if (!vals.Contains(item.Value))
            {
                newDict.Add(item.Key, item.Value);
                vals.Add(item.Value);
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
foreach (var key in mydict.Keys)
  tempdict[mydict[key]] = key;
foreach (var value in tempdict.Keys)
  uniquedict[tempdict[value]] = value;
share|improve this answer
Dictionary<string, string> test = new Dictionary<string,string>();
test.Add("1", "blue");
test.Add("2", "blue");
test.Add("3", "green");
test.Add("4", "red");
Dictionary<string, string> test2 = new Dictionary<string, string>();
foreach (KeyValuePair<string, string> entry in test)
{
    if (!test2.ContainsValue(entry.Value))
        test2.Add(entry.Key, entry.Value);
}
share|improve this answer

In addition to the answer of Jon Skeet , if your value is an intern object you can use :

var uniqueValues = myDict.GroupBy(pair => pair.Value.Property)
                     .Select(group => group.First())
                     .ToDictionary(pair => pair.Key, pair => pair.Value);

This way you will remove the duplicate only on one property of the object

share|improve this answer

This is how I did it:

                dictionary.add(control, "string1");
                dictionary.add(control, "string1");
                dictionary.add(control, "string2");
              int x = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < dictionary.Count; i++)
        {         
            if (dictionary.ElementAt(i).Value == valu)
            {
                x++;
            }
            if (x > 1)
            {
                dictionary.Remove(control);
            }
        }
share|improve this answer

Just a footnote to those using the Revit API, this is one method that works for me in removing duplicate elements, when you can't use say wallType as your object type and instead need to leverage raw elements. it's a beaut mate.

  //Add Pair.value to known values HashSet
                 HashSet<string> knownValues = new HashSet<string>();

                Dictionary<Wall, string> uniqueValues = new Dictionary<Wall, string>();

                 foreach (var pair in wall_Dict)
                 {
                     if (knownValues.Add(pair.Value))
                     {
                         uniqueValues.Add(pair.Key, pair.Value);
                     }
                 }
share|improve this answer

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