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I have a Time object T. What's a reasonable way to add N days to T?

The best I've come up with feels somewhat tortured:

require 'date'
def add_days(time, days)
  time.to_date.next_day(days).to_time
end

P.S.: If you are in the US, a correct answer must satisfy:

add_days(Time.new(2013, 3, 10, 0), 1) == Time.new(2013, 3, 11, 0)

and if you are in the EU, a correct answer must satisfy:

add_days(Time.new(2013, 3, 31, 0), 1) == Time.new(2013, 4, 1, 0)

P.P.S: This is a Ruby question, not a Rails question.

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4 Answers 4

This is somewhat of a lateral answer but because in your original question you weren't concerned about the HMS section of Time, wouldn't you be better of using Date objects instead?

t=Time.now
d=Date.parse(t.to_s)
puts d+1 # => gives you tomorrow's day (YMD)
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ActiveSupport::TimeWithZone seems to handle this well

> t1 = ActiveSupport::TimeZone['Eastern Time (US & Canada)'].parse('2013-03-10')
 => Sun, 10 Mar 2013 00:00:00 EST -05:00 

Notice the class type below:

 > t1.class
 => ActiveSupport::TimeWithZone 

Notice the change from EST above to EDT below:

> t1 + 1.day
 => Mon, 11 Mar 2013 00:00:00 EDT -04:00 
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1  
Can actually just do this: t1 = ActiveSupport::TimeZone['Eastern Time (US & Canada)'].parse('2013-03-12').dst? The key is the Eastern Time. If you use EST or EDT, like I was doing, it will always show in those time zones whether or not ET is currently in DST or not. –  Dex Oct 15 '13 at 5:14
    
Good answer, though I was originally asking about a Ruby environment that didn't have ActiveSupport. Now that things are better modularized, it would be reasonable to include standalone ActiveSupport to get this functionality. –  fearless_fool Oct 15 '13 at 17:54
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As appears to have become my style, I am answering my own question.

Since the transition across DST / ST is rather rare (and in many parts of the world, nonexistent), a more efficient approach is to first add (n_days * 24 * 60 * 60) seconds and then check if the UTC offset has changed. If it has, then create a corrected time object.

Like this:

def add_days(time, n_days)
  t2 = time + (n_days * 24 * 60 * 60)
  utc_delta = time.utc_offset - t2.utc_offset
  (utc_delta == 0) ? t2 : t2 + utc_delta
end

This approach and avoids a lot of extra object creation, and handles transitions across Daylight Savings properly (at least in my current time zone, Pacific Time):

>> t1 = Time.new(2013, 3, 10, 0, 0, 0)
=> 2013-03-10 00:00:00 -0800  # midnight Mar 3, 2013 Pacific Standard Time
>> t2 = add_days(t1, 1)
=> 2013-03-11 00:00:00 -0700  # midnight Mar 4, 2013 Pacific Daylight Time
>> t2 - t1
=> 82800.0                    # a shorter than usual day

>> u1 = Time.new(2013, 11, 3, 0, 0, 0)
=> 2013-11-03 00:00:00 -0700  # midnight Nov 3, 2013 Pacific Daylight Time
>> u2 = add_days(u1, 1)
=> 2013-11-04 00:00:00 -0800  # midnight Nov 4, 2013 Pacific Standard Time
>> u2 - u1
=> 90000.0                    # a longer than usual day
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Time has a + method which accepts seconds.

N = 3

t = Time.now + N * 86400 # 24 * 60 * 60 

Or, if you bring ActiveSupport in, it's easier

require 'active_support/core_ext'

t = Time.now + N.days

You can obviously make your own helper

class Fixnum
  def days
    self * 86400
  end
end

t = Time.now # => 2013-01-31 16:06:31 +0700

t + 3.days # => 2013-02-03 16:06:31 +0700
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2  
Adding seconds like that will give the wrong answer across DST boundaries –  Frederick Cheung Jan 31 '13 at 9:15
    
@FrederickCheung: ah, didn't think about that. But it's simpler. Also, it satisfies OP's specification. Please, feel free to add your answer, I'll delete mine. –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 31 '13 at 9:19
    
@SergioTulentsev: your answer does not satisfy the original spec -- try it out on the 'correct answer must satisfy' to see what I mean. –  fearless_fool Jan 31 '13 at 9:34
    
@FrederickCheung: on the other hand, are you sure about DST? Could you provide a snippet with a problem? –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 31 '13 at 9:35
    
@fearless_fool: I did! pastie.org/5982565. Did you? –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 31 '13 at 9:36
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