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I've noticed when using jQuery.fn.animate() I can pass some or all of the parameters (css for animation, callback function, easing, and duration) in any order to the function.

Looking into the function source code, it starts like this:

function (prop, speed, easing, callback) {
    var empty = jQuery.isEmptyObject(prop),
        optall = jQuery.speed(speed, easing, callback),
.
.
.

And then it starts to actually process the information passed. So, obviously the css properties object has to be first in the chain - otherwise it will break the function (or is it?). But then look at jQuery.speed:

function (speed, easing, fn) {
    var opt = speed && typeof speed === "object" ? jQuery.extend({},
    speed) : {
        complete: fn || !fn && easing || jQuery.isFunction(speed) && speed,
        duration: speed,
        easing: fn && easing || easing && !jQuery.isFunction(easing) && easing
    };
.
.
.

Obviously this is where the magic's at. But jQuery's approach to cutting down on parentheses and braces makes it difficult for me to breakdown all those conditionals. Can you please simplify the jQuery.speed function? Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
No, jquery only tests the type of the arguments to detect if you omitted some of them. But no jQuery function let you change the order of the arguments? –  dystroy Jan 31 '13 at 9:34
    
My bad then, I thought it does. Can you answer the question? –  pilau Jan 31 '13 at 9:35
    
Rewrite all this code in a more readable manner ? Of course I could. And probably you too. But that's tedious... –  dystroy Jan 31 '13 at 9:36
    
Are you being serious? I don't understand the logic behind this code :( –  pilau Jan 31 '13 at 9:37
1  
Have a Google for javascript operators and falsy comparisons. I think that's the source of your confusion with this code. Once you have a grasp of those it's fairly straightforward code. –  Rory McCrossan Jan 31 '13 at 9:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Written in a more comprehensive way, this is what jQuery does:

function (speed, easing, fn) {
    var opt;
    if (speed && typeof speed === "object") {
        opt = jQuery.extend({}, speed);
    }
    else {
        var complete_p,
            duration_p = speed,
            easing_p;

        // Find out what's the "complete" property
        if (fn) complete_p = fn;
        else {
            if (easing) {
                complete_p = easing;
            }
            else {
                if (jQuery.isFunction(speed)) {
                    complete_p = speed;
                }
            }
        }

        // Find out what's the "easing" property
        if (fn) {
            easing_p = easing;
        }
        else {
            if (easing) {
                if (!jQuery.isFunction(easing)) {
                    easing_p = easing;
                }
            }
        }

        opt = {
            complete: complete_p,
            duration: duration_p,
            easing: easing_p
        };
    }
.
.
.

So... yes, it's doing some checks to allow you to change the order. I wouldn't rely on it, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic. I read this: nfriedly.com/techblog/2009/07/… and also compared the original code with your answer, and I have to say - there's some serious compaction going on in there! Thanks. –  pilau Jan 31 '13 at 10:00

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