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Suppose I have a set of JAX-RS locators and sublocators, like the following:

@Path("/users")
public class UserListResource {
   @Path("/{id}")
   public UserResource getCustomer(@PathParam("id") int id) {
      // Find and return user object
   }
}

public class UserResource {
  @GET
  public String get() {...}
}

For example, a UserResource object with the ID 5 would have the path "/users/5". In my system, I have several different resources.

Now the question is: How can the server figure out the path of a given resource? Can I do this programmatically via some JAX-RS API or do I have to implement code that uses reflection? (I know how to do the latter, but would prefer the other approach.)

  • At the point when I need to know the path, I do not have a request object at all. For example, I have a timer which does some background processing, then changes some entities in the domain model, then informs all clients about the changed entities (including their paths).
  • I know that within the scope of a request, I can inject a UriInfo object that provides this, but I need to know the path in advance (to inform clients of a change that did not necessarily happen through the JAX-RS resource).
  • I don't want to repeat the path information in another place, and I also don't want to have a set of path fragment constants for each resource type (in this case "/users" and "/{id}").
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Not sure what you want to do here. Specifically, at which point do you need to know the request and what do you want to do with it? It sounds like a filter might help you, but you'll need to define your use case more clearly. –  jgm Jan 31 '13 at 10:02
    
I tried to explain it more clearly, see above. –  Jens Bannmann Jan 31 '13 at 10:22
    
You want to change something and inform the clients? That is not a RESTful architecture (and that is what JAX-RS is for). –  SatelliteSD Jan 31 '13 at 10:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As I read your question, you need to build a URI knowing only the resource class and the id parameter.

It can be done using the UriBuilder class as in:

UriBuilder builder=UriBuilder.fromResource(UserListResource.class);
URI uri=builder.path(UserListResource.class,"getCustomer").build(5);

It uses reflection under the hood, so it is not so easy to refactor, but it is all it is available at the moment.

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Overall, be aware that something sounds rather strange with the architecture of your application. It's hard to put a finger on, but the pattern of questions you are asking is raising a number of red flags about how you're going about this. Be aware that if you are seeking to create a RESTful API to your application that you may need to stop, take a few steps back, and rethink what you are trying to do.

To your explicit questions…

Now the question is: How can the server figure out the path of a given resource? Can I do this programmatically via some JAX-RS API or do I have to implement code that uses reflection? (I know how to do the latter, but would prefer the other approach.)

The server knows the path, as that's always supplied by the user and is used to navigate through the collection of resource classes that make up your application. If you need a UriInfo instance for a particular call, you should inject it as part of that specific call:

@GET
public String get(@Context UriInfo info) {...}

Any information required from the outer context (e.g., what the resource's ID is) is best passed in during construction. You can reparse it out of the URL (obtainable from the UriInfo) again, but that's probably the wrong approach.

Otherwise, if you're doing something much more complex then you need to be more specific in your question.

  • At the point when I need to know the path, I do not have a request object at all. For example, I have a timer which does some background processing, then changes some entities in the domain model, then informs all clients about the changed entities (including their paths).
  • I know that within the scope of a request, I can inject a UriInfo object that provides this, but I need to know the path in advance (to inform clients of a change that did not necessarily happen through the JAX-RS resource).

How are you going to have the clients be informed? There's normally no mechanism to push messages from the server to the clients, and clients are typically firewalled so that they can't directly host a service.

Theoretically, you could associate (explicitly, by URL) each resource with its own RSS feed to which a client could listen to if they chose. You wouldn't be able to force clients to listen, but you could give them the option to do so. If you go this route, you don't need to know the UriInfo “ahead of time” as the location information will be present at key times (i.e., at resource creation) and afterwards you're just referring to something that you have control over.

But that's just one way to do it and it adds a lot of complexity; you'd only do it if it was critical to your application. It's often simpler to just have clients poll from time to time. (Note that some sorts of modifications are inherently very destructive; particularly altering the ID or deleting the resource. Don't expect things to cope smoothly with those.)

  • I don't want to repeat the path information in another place, and I also don't want to have a set of path fragment constants for each resource type (in this case "/users" and "/{id}").

Tough. Repeating information in multiple places, provided you draw it consistently from a single source, is a common practice. There's nothing actually wrong with it.

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Thanks for the informative reply! Regarding the client notification: yes, the instant updates are critical. We're using WebSocket to avoid client pull, and firewalls are not as big a problem as on the web as this is an intranet application where administrators are more likely to cooperate. For more details on what we ended up doing, see my own answer. –  Jens Bannmann Feb 5 '13 at 9:42

As I understand your question, you want to know the path as the request is coming in but before it hits your resource; are you open to using Servlet Filters?

JAX-RS specific filters are only supported in 2.0

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A servlet filter won't help me, I have no request (see the bullet points inside the question). I want to determine the information before there is a request. –  Jens Bannmann Jan 31 '13 at 10:32
    
OK now I get you. You basically want a server push. You can use Web Socket or Server Sent Event (SSE). I've not used Web Socket but for SSE have a look at this <weblogs.java.net/blog/bhaktimehta/archive/2012/04/21/…;. I've used this on GF 3. Download the latest from the repo and build it. If you want to integrate SSE with XMPP, have a look at this <oneminutedistraction.wordpress.com/2012/09/12/…; –  Chuk Lee Jan 31 '13 at 12:10
    
Well, actually I had already implemented a notification interface via Web Socket. My question was about how to determine the URLs that I send over this interface - see the accepted answer. –  Jens Bannmann Feb 5 '13 at 9:12

For the record: after I had posted the question, I thought about our architecture a bit more and came to the conclusion that sending URLS is not as useful as I thought. The application has to know some details about the application structure anyway:

  • Continuing the example above: even if the client did not know the URL pattern for individual users, it must assume that there is a list of users and know its URL; it also has hard-coded knowledge what dialog to display for editing a user etc.

So all in all, attempting to tell the client (most) URLs it needs is not worth the effort. Instead, we decided to go with a custom API definition file which includes data about the resource contents and their URL scheme. This file is used to generate the following:

  • the server-side resource classes with the correct JAX-RS annotations
  • a URL scheme specification document for other developers to code against
  • classes for our own client (including the URL know how, e.g. user with ID 5 has the URL ...), so we don't have to worry about inconsistencies between our client and server.

This approach has the following advantages:

  • The need for the server to figure out the URLs from the annotations vanishes, as the client can now do that on its own once it receives a notification that includes the object ID.
  • We don't have to worry about inconsistencies between our client and the server, as all information is drawn from a single source.
  • We have one source for the API definition under version control which can be used to verify backwards compatibility with older releases.

Note: I would probably not claim that the resulting API stays "faithful" to the idea of RESTful webservices, but it works for us and the elements that it borrows from "actual" REST architectural style should make the API clearer and easier to learn than a traditional contract-first webservice.

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