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I have a class which represents a character sequence and I’d like to implement an operator >> for it. My implementation currently looks like this:

inline std::istream& operator >>(std::istream& in, seq& rhs) {
    std::copy(
        std::istream_iterator<char>(in),
        std::istream_iterator<char>(),
        std::back_inserter(rhs));
    // `copy` doesn't know when to stop reading so it always also sets `fail`
    // along with `eof`, even if reading succeeded. On the other hand, when
    // reading actually failed, `eof` is not going to be set.
    if (in.fail() and in.eof())
        in.clear(std::ios_base::eofbit);
    return in;
}

However, the following predictably fails:

std::istringstream istr("GATTACA FOO");
seq s;
assert((istr >> s) and s == "GATTACA");

In particular, once we reach the space in “GATTACA FOO”, the copying stop (expected) and sets the failbit on the istream (also expected). However, the read operation actually succeeded as far as seq is concerned.

Can I model this at all using std::copy? I also thought of using an istreambuf_iterator instead but this doesn’t actually solve this particular problem.

What’s more, a read operation on the input “GATTACAFOOshould fail since that input doesn’t represent a valid DNA sequence (which is what my class represents). On the other hand, reading an int from the input 42foo actually succeeds in C++ so maybe I should consider every valid prefix as a valid input?

(Incidentally, this would be fairly straightforward with an explicit loop but I’m trying to avoid explicit loops in favour of algorithms.)

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If it's more straightforward with a loop than with algorithms (because you wouldn't be asking this otherwise), then just use a damn loop. Maintainability. –  Cat Plus Plus Jan 31 '13 at 9:57
    
@Cat I didn’t say “more straightforward”. In fact, I claim that when using the appropriate algorithm (and if appropriate sequence adaptors exist) the algorithm solution is always more straightforward than using a loop. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 31 '13 at 10:04
    
You could use templates, and you could somehow find a way to use multiple inheritance, threads and anything you can dream of, but it just would make your life so much harder and not give you any visible benefits. So why force yourself to use iterators and algorithms that obviously don't fit the needs of the task at hand? Keep it simple, use that plain loop and go on to solve the real problems. Don't mess up your project with 15 lines of workarounds to get in one line of a library solution meant to be slick and elegant. –  Arne Mertz Jan 31 '13 at 10:08
1  
@Arne Whoa, take the chill pill, man. I’m not doing any of the things you’re accusing me of. And I’m explicitly asking whether my approach is at all appropriate. But if you dismiss this approach as “obviously [not] fit” then I think you cannot contribute much. Otherwise why do input iterator adaptors exist in the first place? –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 31 '13 at 10:12
    
@KonradRudolph sorry if I overstated that one. What I mean is: if you have to struggle to get the sequence adaptors then the algorithm is not more straightforward. In your case, you'll have to parse the input to validate it. Parsing does not fit with plain iterating algorithms, so I doubt you'll find anything suitable in <algorithm>. –  Arne Mertz Jan 31 '13 at 10:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't want to clear(eofbit) because the failbit should stay set if reading failed due to reaching EOF. Otherwise if you just leave eofbit set without failbit then a loop such as while (in >> s) will attempt another read after reaching EOF, and then that read will set failbit again. Except if it was using your operator>> it would clear it, and try to read again. And again. And again. The right behaviour for a stream is to set failbit if reading failed because of EOF, so just leave it set.

To do this with iterators and an algorithm you'd need something like

copy_while(InputIter, InputIter, OutputIter, Pred);

which would copy the input sequence only while the predicate was true, but that doesn't exist in the standard library. You could certainly write one though.

template<typename InputIter, typename OutputIter, typename Pred>
  OutputIter
  copy_while(InputIter begin, InputIter end, OutputIter result, Pred pred)
  {
    while (begin != end)
    {
      typename std::iterator_traits<InputIter>::value_type value = *begin;
      if (!pred(value))
        break;
      *result = value;
      result++;
      begin++;
    }
    return result;
  }

Now you could use that like this:

inline bool
is_valid_seq_char(char c)
{ return std::string("ACGT").find(c) != std::string::npos; }

inline std::istream&
operator>>(std::istream& in, seq& rhs)
{
    copy_while(
        std::istream_iterator<char>(in),
        std::istream_iterator<char>(),
        std::back_inserter(rhs),
        &is_valid_seq_char);
    return in;
}

int main()
{
    std::istringstream istr("GATTACA FOO");
    seq s;
    assert((istr >> s) and s == "GATTACA");
}

This works, but the problem is that istream_iterator uses operator>> to read characters, so it skips over whitespace. This means the space following "GATTACA" is consumed by the algorithm and discarded, so adding this to the end of main would fail:

assert(istr.get() == ' ');

To solve this use istreambuf_iterator which doesn't skip whitespace:

inline std::istream&
operator>>(std::istream& in, seq& rhs)
{
    copy_while(
        std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(in),
        std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(),
        std::back_inserter(rhs),
        &is_valid_seq_char);
    return in;
}

To complete this, you probably want to indicate failure to extract a seq if no characters where extracted:

inline std::istream&
operator>>(std::istream& in, seq& rhs)
{
    copy_while( std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(in), {},
        std::back_inserter(rhs), &is_valid_seq_char);
    if (seq.empty())
      in.setstate(std::ios::failbit);  // no seq in stream
    return in;
}

That final version also uses one of my favourite C++11 tricks to simpify it slightly, by using {} for the end iterator. The type of the second argument to copy_while must be the same as the type of the first argument, which is deduced as std::istreambuf_iterator<char>, so the {} simply value-initializes another iterator of that same type.

Edit: If you want a closer match to std::string extraction then you can do so too:

inline std::istream&
operator>>(std::istream& in, seq& rhs)
{
    std::istream::sentry s(in);
    if (s)
    {
        copy_while( std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(in), {},
                    std::back_inserter(rhs), &is_valid_seq_char);
        int eof = std::char_traits<char>::eof();
        if (std::char_traits<char>::eq_int_type(in.rdbuf()->sgetc(), eof))
            in.setstate(std::ios::eofbit);
    }
    if (rhs.empty())
        in.setstate(std::ios::failbit);
    return in;
}

The sentry will skip leading whitespace and if you reach the end of the input it will set eofbit. The other change that should probably be made is to empty the seq before pushing anything into it, e.g. start with rhs.clear() or equivalent for your seq type.

share|improve this answer
    
I was originally going to mention in the question that I cannot use istreambuf_iterator since I’m not actually reading the stream’s underlying char type, I’m reading a custom type (which corresponds to a single unsigned char) and I need to use the that type’s stream input operator. I though of solving the problem using noskipws but I’ve given up for the moment. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 31 '13 at 12:36
    
Great, copy_while was just what I was thinking about in my comment. +1 for the {} trick, too. –  Arne Mertz Jan 31 '13 at 12:41
1  
@KonradRudolph why not reading from an iterator sequence that reads char and output to a iterator that writes your type? If there's an implicit conversion that should work. –  Arne Mertz Jan 31 '13 at 12:44
    
@Arne There is no implicit conversion, and the explicit conversion will throw if the value is invalid, rather than putting the stream into an error state. But actually the latter isn’t a problem at all once I switch to using take_while, and the conversion issue I can work around. Thanks for the hint, I’ll try that. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 31 '13 at 12:57
    
Actually, this code doesn’t work entirely for me. In your example, std::cin.eof() == false after reading. If, on the other hand, I were reading a std::string, eof would be true. Illustrative code –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 31 '13 at 14:58

In particular, once we reach the space in “GATTACA FOO”, the copying stop (expected)

That assumption is already false. Instead you't get

std::istringstream istr("GATTACA FOO");
seq s;
assert(!(istr >> s) && s == "GATTACAFOO");

Copying using an istream_iterator<char> and a standard copyalgorithm can't work, because that will always extract character until the end of stream.

You need a copy that terminates prematurely, if an end condition is reached and the end condition must not extract the non-matching character (i.e. using in.peek() or even directly looking at the streambuf).

To do so using std::copy() would require your own special purpose stream iterator (that compares equal to an end iterator, if the termination condition is matched by the next character. IMHO that creates more obscurity than an explicit loop. YMMV

share|improve this answer
    
Right, don't consume the entire input then bugger about with stream state flags, consume a valid sequence (which means checking as you go and stopping at the end of the valid sequence, like the "42foo" case, when in doubt, do as the ints do!) and only manually alter the stream state if you fail to extract any valid sequence (because calling the operator>> overload for extracting sequences when there's no sequence in the stream is a failure.) Let the stream manage eofbit when it reaches EOF, don't set it earlier and don't clear it if EOF is reached –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 31 '13 at 11:13

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