Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Please explain why there is a difference between the O/P of the following codes... 1> When virtual inheritance is used for class A and B then B::f is called 2> When there is no virtual inheritance for A and B then L::f is called

If you use different combinations of virtual inheritance / non virtual inheritance and pointer casting for virtual and non virtual functions then few o/p OR error surely surprise you.

Thats why I am looking for some generic rules which c++ compiler always follows. In other words how can I predict the o/p OR error without compiling the code OR running it.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class L{
    public :
    virtual void f(){
    cout<<"L::f()"<<endl;
    }
};

class A: public virtual L{
    public : 
    /*
    virtual void f(){
    cout<<"A::f()"<<endl;
    }
    */
};

class B : public virtual L{
    public :
    virtual void f(){
        cout<<"B::f()"<<endl;
    }
};

class C : public B, public A {
    public :
    /*
    virtual void f(){
        cout<<"C::f()"<<endl;
    }
    */
};

int main(){

    A* ptr = new C();
    ptr->f();
    return 0;
} 
share|improve this question

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.