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I am working on a UITableView that is very much like the iOS's native Photo app: it has many rows with 4 image thumbnails in each row. (i.e. each UITableViewCell has 4 UIImageViews) All thumbnails loaded from Core Data.

I have revised my implementation multiple times and I can see performance improvements, but it is still unable to scroll as smooth as the Photo app.

I need advise on how to properly cache the photos for best performance. This is what I tried:

1. My first attempt (extremely lag when scrolling)

  • Images are stored with type Transformable in CoreData.
  • In cellForRow function, each image is fetched from CoreData on the fly.

2. Second attempt (faster, but still lag a bit when scrolling)

  • Images are stored with type Binary Data with 'external storage' option ticked in CoreData.
  • In cellForRow function, each image is first loaded from Core Data and then stored into NSCache in memory, so next time cellForRow fires, we will use the UIImage from NSCache directly if available.

After using NSCache to cache images loaded from CoreData, scrolling is visibly faster but since images still have to be loaded from CoreData when it is not yet available in NSCache, scrolling will still be jerky from times to times.

So, there must be a better way, I could preload all the images into memory but since there might be large number or rows of images so I didnt plan to preload the images at all.

What else can I do to load the image faster in cellForRowAtIndexPath?

share|improve this question
    
where are you loading your images from? is it a webserver or the local iphone albums ? – MuhammadBassio Jan 31 '13 at 10:44
    
Hi Muhammad, the images are actually Facebook profile images of a user's Facebook friends. I used AFNetworking class to download them asynchronously and then display it and store them into Core Data + NSCache. When I was debugging this problem, I simplified the scenario into this: All images are already downloaded and available in CoreData and I merely load them from CoreData (imagine user viewing their Facebook album in offline mode). The table is still scrolling slowly and that's why I didnt mention about the downloading part in the question to simplify the issue. Thanks! – mkto Jan 31 '13 at 11:06
    
More clarification: If I used UIImageView+AFNetworking then I can display a table of a user's facebook friend's avatar images smoothly without scrolling problem. BUT this means that the app will have to download the images from the server again and again each time the app loads. I tried to use SDURLCache to cache the images offline but it is not working, and I like to have fine control of the caching so I decided to only download the profile images using AFNetworking but cache it for offline using CoreData myself. – mkto Jan 31 '13 at 11:10
up vote 24 down vote accepted

To keep your scrolling smooth regardless of where your data comes from, you need to fetch your data on a separate thread and only update the UI when you have the data in memory. Grand Central Despatch is the way to go. Here's a skeleton which assume you have a self.photos dictionary with a text reference to an image file. The image thumbnail may or may not be loaded into a live dictionary; may or may not be in a filesystem cache; otherwise is fetched from an online store. It could use Core Data, but the key to smooth scrolling is that you don't wait around for the data wherever it comes from.

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
    {
    static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Photo Cell";
    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
    //identify the data you are after
    id photo = [self.photos objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
        // Configure the cell based on photo id

      dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
        //move to an asynchronous thread to fetch your image data
            UIImage* thumbnail = //get thumbnail from photo id dictionary (fastest)
            if (!thumbnail) {    //if it's not in the dictionary
                thumbnail =      //get it from the cache  (slower)
                                 // update the dictionary
                if (!thumbnail) {   //if it's not in the cache
                  thumbnail =       //fetch it from the (online?) database (slowest)
                                    // update cache and dictionary
                    }
                }
            }
            if (thumbnail) {  
                dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
                //return to the main thread to update the UI
                    if ([[tableView indexPathsForVisibleRows] containsObject:indexPath]) {
                    //check that the relevant data is still required
                        UITableViewCell * correctCell = [self.tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:indexPath];
                        //get the correct cell (it might have changed)
                        [[correctCell imageView] setImage:thumbnail];
                        [correctCell setNeedsLayout];
                    }
                });
            }
        });
    return cell;
    }

If you are using some kind of singleton image store manager, you would expect the manager to deal with the details of cache / database access, which simplifies this example.

This part

            UIImage* thumbnail = //get thumbnail from photo id dictionary (fastest)
            if (!thumbnail) {    //if it's not in the dictionary
                thumbnail =      //get it from the cache  (slower)
                                 // update the dictionary
                if (!thumbnail) {   //if it's not in the cache
                  thumbnail =       //fetch it from the (online?) database (slowest)
                                    // update cache and dictionary
                    }
                }

would be replaced with something like

      UIImage* thumbnail = [[ImageManager singleton] getImage];

(you wouldn't use a completion block as you are effectively providing one in GCD when you return to the main queue)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! Can I ask u one more question, is it the same if I use completion block? like [ImageManager singleton] getImageWithBlock:(void (^)(NSArray *images))block – mkto Jan 31 '13 at 13:01
    
@dunforget - Kind of - a completion block waits (asynchronously) for it's method to finish - the method triggers the block on completion (it's similar to the way delegates work). But the block itself will be queued on the main thread unless you instruct it otherwise. In general, you need to run stuff on the main thread if it affects the UI. But anything that is non-UI should be moved off the main thread if it is going to block the user experience. – foundry Jan 31 '13 at 13:26
    
@dunforget, if you are using some kind of Image manager singleton, you can expect that to deal with all of the dictionary/cache/url access details... so the async part of my example can be reduced to one line. I've updated the answer. Also there was an error where I called dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue() right after the call to the async thread - corrected. – foundry Jan 31 '13 at 14:00
    
Really good answer. I didnt have a problem with that case but I upvoted it for sure! – NDY Jan 31 '13 at 14:13
    
cool. thanks for the answer :) – mkto Jan 31 '13 at 14:42

I've used a class called JMImageCache to cache the image to disk and then only store the local URL (and remote URL if you like) in CoreData. You can also generate a thumbnail that you also save to disk and store the thumbnail URL along with the image URL in core data, and use the thumbnail in the table view.

share|improve this answer
    
THansk for the tips on the cache class, im am not aware of it – mkto Jan 31 '13 at 13:03

Add a subClass of NSValueTransformer for image in core data,

Code like follows:

+ (BOOL)allowsReverseTransformation {
    return YES;
}
+ (Class)transformedValueClass {
    return [NSData class];
}
 - (id)transformedValue:(id)value {
    return UIImageJPEGRepresentation(value, 0.5);
 }
- (id)reverseTransformedValue:(id)value {
    return [[UIImage alloc] initWithData:value];
} 
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