Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

seems that all async examples end up calling a .net async method,

is it possible to create a custom async method that is not calling a .net async method ?

this is where I got so far:

    [Test]
    public void Test()
    {
        TestAsync();
    }

    public async void TestAsync()
    {
        await DoStuffAsync(1);

        Task.Run(() => DoStuffAsync(73));

        await Task.WhenAll(DoStuffAsync(2), DoStuffAsync(3));
    }

    public async Task DoStuffAsync(int n)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        Console.WriteLine("done stuff " + n);
    }

the only problem with this is that VS says that async keyword in DoStuffAsync is useless (cuz there's no await), but I don't need await, I just need the possibility to await this method

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The primary purpose of the async keyword is to enable the await keyword. An async method without an await doesn't make much sense, hence the compiler warning.

You can implement a Task-returning method without async, as such:

public Task DoStuffAsync(int n)
{
  return Task.Delay(1000);
}

If you want to create your own Tasks from scratch, use Task.Run or TaskCompletionSource<T> (or one of its shortcuts such as Task.FromResult or TaskFactory.FromAsync).

P.S. You generally want to avoid async void; use async Task instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Note Task.FromResult != Task.Run. Task.FromResult(Foo()) will block and Task.Run(() => Foo()) will not block. Also async void is intended for async event hanlders. async void mybutton_click(..) – Rytis I Apr 1 at 9:53
public async void TestAsync()
{
    await DoStuffAsync(1);

    await DoStuffAsync(73);

    await Task.WhenAll(DoStuffAsync(2), DoStuffAsync(3));
}

public async Task DoStuffAsync(int n)
{
    await Task.Delay(1000);
    Console.WriteLine("done stuff " + n);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.