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I'm writing a pluralization framework using .NET for Windows Store apps. For a custom formatter string Format(string format, params object[] args), I have the following code:

public static bool IsExactlyOne(object n)
{
    if (n is Int16)
    {
        return (Int16)n == 1;
    }
    if (n is int) // Int32
    {
        return (int)n == 1;
    }
    if (n is long) // Int64
    {
        return (long)n == 1L;
    }
    if (n is UInt16)
    {
        return (UInt16)n == 1U;
    }
    if (n is uint) // UInt32
    {
        return (uint)n == 1U;
    }
    if (n is ulong) // UInt64
    {
        return (ulong)n == 1UL;
    }
    if (n is byte)
    {
        return (byte)n == 1;
    }
    if (n is sbyte)
    {
        return (sbyte)n == 1;
    }
    if (n is float)
    {
        return (float)n == 1.0F;
    }
    if (n is double)
    {
        return (double)n == 1.0D;
    }
    if (n is decimal)
    {
        return (decimal)n == 1.0M;
    }

    throw new ArgumentException("Unsupported type");
}

As you see, it's pretty verbose. Is there some way to simplify this? Please note: IConvertible is not available for Windows Store apps.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a specific reason for using object at all? I'd use ulong or double instead, because implicit conversion should do the rest? And I wouldn't expect a string, list or something else being passed. –  Mario Jan 31 '13 at 11:04
    
Sometimes you don't have a choice (IValueConverter for example) –  Shahar Prish Jan 31 '13 at 11:09
    
@Mario: It's object, because this function is part of a custom formatter following the .NET style Format(string format, params object[] args) –  Sebastian Negraszus Jan 31 '13 at 12:15
    
I think you're best off leaving it as is. There are too many corner cases to check if you try anything shorter than that. –  juharr Jan 31 '13 at 12:30
    
@Sebastian Negraszus: Have you tried the code in my answer? –  Ken Kin Feb 1 '13 at 10:28
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about using Dictionary to avoid if:

var dic = new Dictionary<Type, Func<object, bool>>()
                    {
                        {typeof(Int16), a => (Int16)a == 1},
                        {typeof(int), a => (int)a == 1},
                         ....
                    };

return dic[n.GetType()](n);

Or use dynamic:

public static bool IsExactlyOne(dynamic n)
{
    return n == 1;
}         
share|improve this answer
1  
The dynamic solution is a good one. The dictionary one is really bad and unnecessary for such a mundane requirement... –  Shahar Prish Jan 31 '13 at 11:12
1  
The dynamic solution look promissing. I have never use dynamic before. Are there any corner cases where your code will behave differently than mine? –  Sebastian Negraszus Jan 31 '13 at 13:34
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This should work just fine:

    bool IsExactlyOne(object n)
    {
        int i;
        int.TryParse(n.ToString(), out i);
        return i == 1;
    }

Unless when dealing with high precision numbers like 1.000000000000001 which is a problem that already exists in the OP's version.

The only way to deal with high precision is using decimal explicitly.

share|improve this answer
    
for added error handling you could return result of the tryparse if false ;) –  Sayse Jan 31 '13 at 11:22
    
This won't work for a double of value 1.0000000000000001 because the ToString only prints out the first 15 digits. –  juharr Jan 31 '13 at 11:24
    
@juharr ok but is 1.0000000000000001 really different from 1? –  Exception Al Jan 31 '13 at 11:26
    
@AndersonSilva Yes, it is. In the OP's current code that would return false, but in your's will return true. –  juharr Jan 31 '13 at 11:29
    
@juharr the OP's current code has the same problem. It also returns true in this case. The problem is when the value gets boxed into object is also gets rounded. –  Exception Al Jan 31 '13 at 11:49
show 5 more comments

Please take a look at the accepted answer here.

string value = "123.3";
double num;
if (!double.TryParse(value, out num))
  throw new InvalidOperationException("Value is not a number.");
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work if the object is an int, long etc... –  Shahar Prish Jan 31 '13 at 11:09
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Here it takes less vertical space =D

public static bool IsExactlyOne(object n)
{
    if (n is Int16)
        return (Int16)n == 1;
    if (n is int) // Int32
        return (int)n == 1;
    if (n is long) // Int64
        return (long)n == 1L;
    if (n is UInt16)
        return (UInt16)n == 1U;
    if (n is uint) // UInt32
        return (uint)n == 1U;
    if (n is ulong) // UInt64
        return (ulong)n == 1UL;
    if (n is byte)
        return (byte)n == 1;
    if (n is sbyte)
        return (sbyte)n == 1;
    if (n is float)
        return (float)n == 1.0F;
    if (n is double)
        return (double)n == 1.0D;
    if (n is decimal)
        return (decimal)n == 1.0M;
    throw new ArgumentException("Unsupported type");
}

On a serious side, what will happens is you do (I've no idea what will happens):

public static bool IsExactlyOne(object n)
{
    return n == (object)1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
In a lot of cases, the check will return false (if the type is not int32 for example) –  Shahar Prish Jan 31 '13 at 11:22
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There you go:

public static bool IsExactlyOne(object n)
{
bool result = false;
try
{
result = Convert.ToDouble(n) == 1.0;
}
catch
{
}
return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work for doubles because they get rounded. The OP's code is checking for exactly one, not is it one if I convert it to int. –  juharr Jan 31 '13 at 11:33
    
Cool. Changed it to ToDouble() –  Shahar Prish Jan 31 '13 at 12:14
    
There are decimal values that ToDouble doesn't work for like 0.99999999999999999999999999M. Maybe ToDecimal would work across the board. –  juharr Jan 31 '13 at 12:27
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