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I will try to explain my question with a little bit of CSS

Option 1

I don't repeat the float:left; all over the place, instead I chain all the class names that are going to float left together.

 .one-little-thing,
 .two-little-things,
 .three-little-things,
 .four-little-things,
 .five-little-things {
    float:left;
}
.one-little-thing {
    color: blue;
}
.two-little-things {
    color: red;
}
.three-little-things {
    color: yellow;
}
.four-little-things {
    color: blue;
}
.five-little-things {
    color: green;
}

Total Number of Characters: 331 (including spaces, but even if you trim the spaces, the example is going to be valid)

Option 2

  • Where I repeat float:left; all over the place, but I get slightly less characters.
.one-little-thing {
    color: blue;
    float:left;
}
.two-little-things {
    color: red;
    float:left;
}
.three-little-things {
    color: yellow;
    float:left;
}
.four-little-things {
    color: blue;
    float:left;
}
.five-little-things {
    color: green;
    float:left;
}

Total Number of Characters: 284

I did exactly the same thing with both pieces of code here, the second way has less characters, which means less bytes.

So my question is this:
Does this mean that the second way is better for performance ? What if I had up to ninety-nine-little-things ?

Why it concerns me
The @extend in Sass allows to for example to @extend .clearfix;, which, if used as in "Option 1" would result in a very, very long selector.

So which is the best way ?

share|improve this question
    
Wild guess: The differences will be relatively minor, and may be unpredictable depending on what browser is being used. –  Andrew Barber Jan 31 '13 at 11:04
    
why not have a separate class for float:left? that way you can just add it once to your style sheet –  Pete Jan 31 '13 at 11:08
    
Pete, the ".left" class would actually make most sense. But I'm trying to find out which of these exact two ways is beter in terms of performance. –  Norris Jan 31 '13 at 11:11
    
this may help developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/Writing_Efficient_CSS –  Pete Jan 31 '13 at 11:12
    
It doesn't say anything about this issue exactly. –  Norris Jan 31 '13 at 11:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With such a minimal difference in characters the performance result will obviously not be noticeable here. However, The benefit of writing CSS the way you did in the first snippet is that you could add a lot of other shared properties in only one place and have them applied to each of the classes. As you add more and more shared properties you will see the character difference tip in favor of the first method.

Also, say you decided to translate your site to support hebrew or another RTL language. All you would have to do is change the float: left to float: right in that one spot instead of each individual class. With that said, I think its important to look at CSS from a usability and longterm scalability perspective instead of pure server performance at a particular instance.

share|improve this answer
    
So you're saying, that I should chain my 99 classes together and it isn't going to affect the Browser processing performance ? –  Norris Jan 31 '13 at 11:52
4  
Here's an awesome article that goes into great detail about the server performance of different selector methods. screwlewse.com/2010/08/… When you talk about chaining the 99 classes together you are essentially saying what the SASS @extend method does. The conclusions: there's hardly any difference between these 2 methods even on extreme test cases. Your decision should be based on other usability and scalability factors, including pre-compilers and other resources you want to use –  DMTintner Jan 31 '13 at 12:07
1  
To suggest that you need to follow the style of the first example to quickly convert your LTR to RTL is silly. A mixin or variable controlling the direction also lets you put it in "one spot", but you're free to follow the style of the second example. –  cimmanon Jan 31 '13 at 13:34
    
@DMTintner Thank you! That link was what I was looking for! –  Norris Jan 31 '13 at 14:01

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