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I have a question about SHA512 hashing with salt between C# and SQL. What is the best way to store hashes, can i just normally after made save them in database from web app? Is it safe to fetch them later when user logs in to verify user? Can I make users and passwords in SQL, hash password and add salt and later to verify user in c# hash with same algorithm remove salt by it's size and compare two hashes?

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What part are you wanting to keep secure? HTTPS will secure the "plain-text" password between client and server.. and your server-side code does the hashing.. The database stores hashed values .. that's the only weak spot I can think of.. I'm unsure of what you're asking specifically.. –  Simon Whitehead Jan 31 '13 at 11:09
    
Yes I understand , but I'm trying to find way to make users in sql database hash their passwords there according to their passwords in active directory but when user logs in web verify its inputed value according to hash value inside sql db, I suppose I need to hash password again to see if equal. Don't know is that possible? –  djedjica Jan 31 '13 at 12:06

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What is the best way to store hashes, can i just normally after made save them in database from web app? Is it safe to fetch them later when user logs in to verify user?

If you're using a correct approach, nothing should happen if you happen to dump all your hashes on pastebin; because of the salt (and preferably pepper), nobody can do anything with your hashes (given they don't have infinite time and computing power).

So yes, you should simply store the hash in an appropriately typed database column. Then upon logging in, you re-hash the inputted plaintext password and compare it to the one stored in the database.

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Thank you, but what about if I want to make users in SQL and not in web app (C#). I understand that using same etc SHA would allow me to verify if inputed value is the same as one hashed in db, but what about salt? Maybe, just occured to me, if I know length of salt I can after pulling data from SQL remove salt in C# and compare it with hashed input? –  djedjica Jan 31 '13 at 13:48
    
"if I know length of salt I can after pulling data from SQL remove salt in C# and compare it with hashed input?" - no. –  CodeCaster Jan 31 '13 at 13:56
    
So there is no way I can create users in SQL and verify them here, in C# this way? –  djedjica Jan 31 '13 at 14:02
    
@djedjica I did not say that. You just cannot extract the original value from a hash, so you cannot compare an unsalted hash with a salted hash if you don't have other data. Please explain what you are trying to do, do not explain what you think the solution is. –  CodeCaster Jan 31 '13 at 14:18
    
I thought about comparing them in web app before salting, so salting would only take place on sql and thus salted hash woul travel to my app which would then remove salt and than compare hash with hashed (but not salted) input in password box. I'm trying to find way to create users, hash and salt their passwords in sql, and on the other side when user logs in,pull that data from sql by username and verify with password user provided. so no plain Text or unsalted hash is sended between. –  djedjica Jan 31 '13 at 14:32

This is a very complex topic and you should really make sure that you get it right - most people don't.

The most comprehensive guide I've seen is the How to Secure Passwords - Developer Best Practices talk by Les Hazlewood and this is what I recommend watching as a good start.

No one here will be able to answer all of your questions without writing a short book so I can only recommend to watch this talk, note problems, solutions, tools and technologies that are explained and then find some more information about them.

Or you can also outsource your users handling to some company that does it correctly, like Stormpath. You can also use OpenID, or BrowserID and don't care about the passwords at all. (Although I wouldn't recommend using BrowserID just yet, at least not until it is possible to reliably verify assertions on your own server.)

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