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I'm using jQuery 1.9.0 and I'm trying to trigger the on() method whenever an option is changed inside a select. It worked with live() but I think its probably something simple that I'm not seeing.

This is my HTML:

<select class="select_exercise">
    <option class="option_exercise">Example 1</option>
    <option class="option_exercise">Example 2</option>
</select>

and my Script:

$("option.option_exercise").on("change","option.option_exercise",function()
{
    alert("i am changing");
});

Here is the fiddle

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The .on() method lets you delegate an event handler higher up the DOM tree. The idea is that you bind an event handler to an ancestor element, but only execute that handler when the event that has reached it originated on a descendant element matching the selector.

In your case, that would be this:

$(".select_exercise").on("change", ".option_exercise", function () {
// ^---- Probably no need to qualify the selectors with a tag name
    alert("i am changing");
});

However, given your example code, this will not work since option elements will never fire change events (the select element will though). Assuming the select element is in the DOM from the time it loads, you can bind directly to it:

$(".select_exercise").on("change", function () {
    alert("i am changing");
});

And if it's not in the DOM initially, you'll have to delegate higher (I'm using body here as an example. You should try and delegate to the closest possible ancestory that will be in the DOM at load):

$("body").on("change", ".select_exercise", function () {
    alert("i am changing");
});
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body might be a bit high and it's a bad habit to overly qualify the selector, it should be (".select_exercise"). –  Christoph Jan 31 '13 at 11:20
    
@Christoph - The selector is over qualified to follow the OPs convention, and body is the only higher element in the OPs fiddle. But yes, you are correct. –  James Allardice Jan 31 '13 at 11:21
    
While that might be true, a good answer should always spot out such problems to help the OP advance beyond the problem stated in the question, especially when one sees obvious problems the OP is not aware of atm. Make a note about this and I will give you +1. –  Christoph Jan 31 '13 at 11:22
    
@Christoph - Also true, but I think it's about striking a balance between massively changed code that might take a while for the OP to get their head around and code that they should understand immediately. And the comments are good place to point out things like that to the OP :) –  James Allardice Jan 31 '13 at 11:25
    
I would not consider omitting the select + a comment why as massively changed code;-p Same for adding a comment about using the closest possible ancestor for performance reasons. –  Christoph Jan 31 '13 at 11:26

$("option.option_exercise").on("change","option.option_exercise" should be $("select.select_exercise").on("change",function()

Demo: Fiddle

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You could try to do the following.

$(".select_exercise").change(function()
{
    alert("i am changing");
});
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you can use

$('.select_exercise').change(function() {
alert('Handler for .change() called.');
});
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Ok

You need to check if the select element has been changed and not one of the option.

In this example i am checking if the select element which has a class called "select_exercise" has been changed.

And i am gessing you want to get the selected option so look at this code

$(".select_exercise").on("change",function()
{
    alert($(this).find(":selected").text()); --Get the selected option text
    alert("i am changing");
});

Fiddle Example

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This works fine:

$("select.select_exercise").on("change", function () {
    alert("i am changing");
});

The select is what changes, not the option, because it's the value of the select that changes, not the options.

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