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I have a small regular expression to split an integer value into 1000 separated and I was just wondering how it works.

Here's a perl code.

$intval = 10000;
$intval =~ s/([+-]?\d)(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/$1,/go;
print $intval;
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3  
You could use YAPE::Regex::Explain, that outputs a breakdown with comments for the given RE. –  larsen Jan 31 '13 at 11:46
    
Thanks for the information. I'd love to use that library next time. –  Miky Jan 31 '13 at 12:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

(...) Any normal set of parentheses is a capture group that can be referenced after the regex matches, using the special variables $1, $2, etc.

[+-]? Brackets create a character group, meaning "match any of these characters". ? means "match zero or one times". So this allows for the possibility of a single + or - at the beginning of the match.

\d Match a single digit.

(?=...) this is a look-ahead. It will require that everything contained in the pattern matches, but not include this in the output "match". Nor will it move the position in the string forward (this means that matches can overlap when using lookahead).

(\d{3})+ match one or more groups of three digits.

(?!\d) the stuff that has matched cannot be followed by another digit.

/$1,/ Replace what matched (remember, this does not include the lookahead portion because that doesn't count as part of the match) with the first capture group, followed by a comma.

go these flags are options setting the regex behavior:

  • g means it repeats until if finds and replaces all matches.
  • o is an optimization telling the interpreter to compile the pattern only once, but it is largely obsolete and makes absolutely no difference in this case since nothing is interpolated into the pattern.

So this regex will replace a single digit, followed by a number of digits that is a multiple of three, with that digit followed by a comma. It runs repeatedly, finding all matches. The effect of this is to insert commas as thousand separators.

One quibble: the [+-]? part is completely unnecessary. Because the regex has no requirements about what comes before a number, a number with a + or - will work just fine even if this part is removed.

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Thank you, dan. –  Miky Jan 31 '13 at 12:17
    
@ikegami, thanks for the clarification. –  dan1111 Jan 31 '13 at 13:10

Anytime you have such doubts, easy way out, use Yape::Regex::Explain

#!perl -w
use strict;
use YAPE::Regex::Explain;

print YAPE::Regex::Explain->new(qr/([+-]?\d)(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/)->explain();

Yields this

The regular expression:

(?-imsx:([+-]?\d)(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d)))

matches as follows:

NODE                     EXPLANATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------
(?-imsx:                 group, but do not capture (case-sensitive)
                         (with ^ and $ matching normally) (with . not
                         matching \n) (matching whitespace and #
                         normally):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (                        group and capture to \1:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    [+-]?                    any character of: '+', '-' (optional
                             (matching the most amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    \d                       digits (0-9)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of \1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (?=                      look ahead to see if there is:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    (                        group and capture to \2 (1 or more times
                             (matching the most amount possible)):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
      \d{3}                    digits (0-9) (3 times)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    )+                       end of \2 (NOTE: because you are using a
                             quantifier on this capture, only the
                             LAST repetition of the captured pattern
                             will be stored in \2)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    (?!                      look ahead to see if there is not:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
      \d                       digits (0-9)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    )                        end of look-ahead
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of look-ahead
----------------------------------------------------------------------
)                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  1. The g modifier indicates that this pattern match needs to be done globally
  2. The o modifier specifies that this pattern has to be compiled once

Checkout perlre modifiers for more info on regex modifiers

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2  
+1 for demonstration of this useful tool. It's worth mentioning that it only supports regex features up to Perl 5.6. This wouldn't be a problem with the OP's regex, though. –  dan1111 Jan 31 '13 at 13:12
    
Thanks @dan1111 didn't realize that myself, upvoted your comment –  user1441609 Mar 27 '13 at 14:47

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