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the following compiles and runs just fine with mingw 4.7.2 and -m64 flag.

but with -m32 or with any mingw 32bit release it fails to compile. is it a bug or am i missing a compiler flag?

    #include <iostream>
    #include <functional>

    using namespace std;

    int __cdecl ccall(int i)
    {
        cout << i << endl;
        return 0;
    }

    int __stdcall stdcall(int i)
    {
        cout << i << endl;
        return 0;
    }

    int __fastcall fastcall(int i)
    {
        cout << i << endl;
        return 0;
    }


    int main() {

        std::function<int(int)> fnc = ccall;
        fnc(10);

        std::function<int(int)> fnstd = stdcall;
        fnstd(100);

        std::function<int(int)> fnfast = fastcall;
        fnfast(200);

        return 0;
    }

error message:

    ...\Local\Temp\cc4ekW9J.s: Assembler messages:
    ...\Local\Temp\cc4ekW9J.s:30: Error: symbol `__ZNSt17_Function_handlerIFiiEPFiiEE9_M_invokeERKSt9_Any_datai' is already defined 
    ...\Local\Temp\cc4ekW9J.s:80: Error: symbol `__ZNSt14_Function_base13_Base_managerIPFiiEE10_M_managerERSt9_Any_dataRKS4_St18_Manager_operation' is already defined
    ...\Local\Temp\cc4ekW9J.s:114: Error: symbol `__ZNSt14_Function_base13_Base_managerIPFiiEE10_M_managerERSt9_Any_dataRKS4_St18_Manager_operation' is already defined

i ended up doing it this way after "hiding" the call in a lambda function it works just fine:

    template<class Ret, class... Args> class StdCall
    {
    public:
        typedef Ret(__stdcall Fn_t)(Args...);
        typedef std::function<Ret (Args...)> Functor_t;
        Functor_t get(Fn_t pFn)
        {
            return [pFn](Args... as){
                return pFn(as...);
            };
        }
    };

    auto fn1 = CdeclCall<int,int>().get( ccall );
    auto fn2 = StdCall<int,int>().get( stdcall );

    fn1(123);
    fn2(156);
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1  
Note that this calling convention stuff is nonstandard –  PlasmaHH Jan 31 '13 at 13:03
3  
On a 64 bit machine there is only __fastcall. This is the reason why it works with a 64 bit compile. __stdcall and __cdecl are simply ignored by the x64 compiler. –  mkaes Jan 31 '13 at 13:12
1  
Does it help if you use std::function<int __stdcall (int)> fnstd = stdcall; and std::function<int __fastcall (int)>? –  wilx Jan 31 '13 at 14:41
    
tanks for you answer. but the compiler doesn´t like this syntax: error: variable 'std::function<int(int)> fnstd' has initializer but incomplete type i ended up doing it this way: template<class Ret, class... Args> class StdCall { public: typedef Ret(__stdcall Fn_t)(Args...); typedef std::function<Ret (Args...)> Functor_t; Functor_t get(Fn_t pFn) { return [pFn](Args... as){ return pFn(as...); }; } }; auto fn1 = CdeclCall<int,int>().get( ccall ); auto fn2 = StdCall<int,int>().get( stdcall ); fn1(123); fn2(156); –  user1283078 Feb 1 '13 at 15:05
    
sry for that mess of comment. i edited my initial post with my "solution" –  user1283078 Feb 1 '13 at 15:16

1 Answer 1

Count yourself lucky. Think about the kind of havoc a function call with the wrong calling convention could cause! Oh, and just create a shim function with the "right" calling convention that calls the "wrong" one. Perhaps you can hide this in a separately compiled file.

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