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im learning C, and have been trying to make a program that takes user input, and removes any double spaces in it, then prints it out again. We have not done arrays yet so I need to do this char by char. This is my code:

#include <stdio.h>

main()
{
    char c;
    int count;
    count = 0;

    while ((c = getchar()) != '\n')
        if (c == ' ')
            count++;
        if (c != ' ')
            count = 0;
        if (count <= 0)
            printf("%s", c);
}

This code does not work, however. The compiler returns the error

:15: warning: format ‘%s’ expects type ‘char *’, but argument 2 has type ‘int’

Any help? I have no clue what I am doing wrong.

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3 Answers

Use the %c format specifier to print a single char

printf("%c", c);

The %s format specifier tells printf to expect a null-terminated char array (aka a string).

The error message refers to c having type int due to default promotion of arguments (beyond the format string) passed to printf. This previous answer has a nice description of default promotion; this previous thread explains some of the reasoning for why default promotion is necessary.

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Can you please explain why the error message refers to int? –  Martin v. Löwis Jan 31 '13 at 13:18
    
@Martinv.Löwis Good point. I've added links to previous threads which contain better explanations than I'd manage –  simonc Jan 31 '13 at 13:25
    
Note that getchar() returns an int, not a char. That way you can distinguish a char read from EOF (can't be a legal char value, obviously). Not the brightest interface, but compact (and customary by now). –  vonbrand Feb 1 '13 at 1:12
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You are using %s which is used for a string and which expects a terminating NULL character(\0)..

Using %c will print you char by char..

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In C, char literals are of type int, so whether promoted or not, they're always int. In C++, char literals would be of type char, but after promotion like other answers said, again they'll be int.

Btw. Your code had many problems. First, your while loop's body is only the first if structure because after that there's a ";" that ends the line. So the code will run like this, which is not like you indented.

while ((c = getchar()) != '\n')
{
    if (c == ' ')
        count++;
}
if (c != ' ')
    count = 0;
if (count <= 0)
    printf("%s", c);

Or if the indented code is what you want, you should include it in a pair of brackets. But in that case why two different ifs? Else would be much more readable and faster

while ((c = getchar()) != '\n')
{
    if (c == ' ')
        count++;
    else
        count = 0;
    if (count <= 0)
        printf("%s", c);
}
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