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I have this data.frame with equal length groups (id)

id  |  amount 
--------------
 A  |   10   
 A  |   54   
 A  |   23   
 B  |   34   
 B  |   76    
 B  |   12    

which I would like to transpose by group id to this:

 id |
----------------------
 A  | 10  |  54 | 23  
 B  | 34  |  76 | 12

What is the most efficient way of doing this?

I've previously used reshape and dcast but they are very slow indeed! (I have A LOT of data and would love to speed up this bottleneck)

Is there a better strategy? Using data.table or matrices?? Any help would be much appreciated!

# Little data.frame
df <- data.frame(id=c(2,2,2,5,5,5), amount=as.integer(c(10,54,23,34,76,12)))

# Not so little data.frame
set.seed(10)
df <- data.frame(id = rep(sample(1:10000, 10000, replace=F),100), amount=as.integer(floor(runif(1000000, -100000,100000))))

# Create time variable
df$time <- ave(as.numeric(df$id), df$id, FUN = seq_along)

# The base R reshape strategy
system.time(df.reshape <-reshape(df, direction = "wide", idvar="id", timevar="time"))
user  system elapsed 
6.36    0.31    6.69 

# The reshape2 dcast strategy
require(reshape2)
a <- system.time(mm <- melt(df,id.vars=c('id','time'),measure.vars=c('amount')))
b <- system.time(df.dcast <- dcast(mm,id~variable+time,fun.aggregate=mean))
a+b
user  system elapsed 
14.44    0.00   14.45 

UPDATE Using the fact that each group is equal in length you can use the matrix-function.

df.matrix <- data.frame(id=unique(df$id), matrix(df$amount, nrow=(length(unique(df$id))), byrow=T))
user  system elapsed 
0.03    0.00    0.03 

Note: This method assumes that the data.frame is presorted by id.

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1  
Maybe you should provide an example that runs in less than two minutes ? :) –  juba Jan 31 '13 at 13:50
2  
@juba - sorry about that, I've made it smaller! I'm eager to find something that will work for lots and lots of data. :) –  wije Jan 31 '13 at 13:59
1  
It might be most efficient to not transpose. Any particular reason why you are doing this? –  Roland Jan 31 '13 at 14:39
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not a problem of reshape. aggregate from base should be able to handle this.

df.out <- aggregate(amount ~ id, data=df, c)
# running on the small data
#   id amount.1 amount.2 amount.3
# 1  2       10       54       23
# 2  5       34       76       12

Isn't this what you wanted?


Okay, seems like an adapted version of DWin's solution is the fastest. However, the result will be ordered by id. If you don't want that, then Aditya's seems to be the one to use.

Here are the functions and the benchmarking results:

  • Using aggregate:

    AGG <- function() {
        df.agg <- aggregate(amount ~ id, data=df, c)
    }
    
  • Using Aditya's

    SEC <- function() {
        df.sec <- cbind(data.frame(id = unique(df$id)), 
                matrix(as.numeric(unlist(tapply(df$amount, df$id, identity))), 
                nrow = length(unique(df$id)), byrow = T))
    }
    
  • Using modified version of Dwin's:

    DWIN_M <- function() {
        df1 <- df[with(df, order(id)), ]
        idx <- df$id[!duplicated(df$id)]
        df.dwin <- cbind(data.frame(id=idx), 
                    as.data.frame(matrix(df1$amount, 
                    nrow=length(idx), byrow=TRUE)))
    }
    
  • Benchmarking:

    require(rbenchmark)
    benchmark(AGG(), SEC(), DWIN_M(), replications=3, order="elapsed")
    
    #      test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
    # 3 DWIN_M()            3   4.175    1.000     4.148    0.000          0         0
    # 2    SEC()            3  17.568    4.208    17.449    0.016          0         0
    # 1    AGG()            3  24.529    5.875    24.306    0.044          0         0
    

Let me know if I've made any errors.

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that took 6.436 seconds on my system –  Aditya Sihag Jan 31 '13 at 14:26
    
@Aditya, yes, aggregate is slower. of course, tapply is better here! If there were more than 1 amount column, aggregate makes more sense. –  Arun Jan 31 '13 at 14:58
    
@Dwin, why did you delete the post? It seems to be really fast (except that the results will be sorted). –  Arun Jan 31 '13 at 15:04
    
@Arun - Awesome work! But am I missing something or is aggregate NOT transposing the data? –  wije Jan 31 '13 at 15:07
1  
@Arun - Yes, it absolutely must be ordered! Presorting it is quite fast though.. –  wije Jan 31 '13 at 15:28
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try this out:

 dFrame<-data.frame(id = c(rep("A",3),rep("B",3)),amount = c(10,54,23,34,76,12))
 newFrame<-cbind(data.frame(id = unique(dFrame$id)),matrix(as.numeric(unlist(tapply(dFrame$amount,dFrame$id,identity))),nrow=length(unique(dFrame$id)),byrow=T))

The bracketing might be off, i've tried to be careful - i don't have an R interpreter available at the moment

benchmark result based on the df sample code you provide:

  replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
   1            1   4.193        1     4.056    0.064          0         0
share|improve this answer
    
you can probably speed this up a bit more by caching the result of unique(dFrame$id) –  Aditya Sihag Jan 31 '13 at 14:28
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A matrix approach would use:

  system.time({ df.reshape <-matrix(df$amount, nrow=10000, byrow=TRUE); 
               rownames(df.reshape)<- df$id[1:10000]
             } )
   user  system elapsed 
  0.010   0.006   0.016 
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