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This is basically my first attempt to understand the classes in C#. I've went through several tutorials on the internet, but the thing I'm missing the most and what I haven't found anywhere yet, is a simple good example.

I have some idea how my basic program should look like and I would appreciate your help:

using System;

namespace Introduction_to_classes
{
    class Person
    {
        int Age;
        string Name;

        int DateOfBirth()
        {
            return 2013 - Age;
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            Person Mother = new Person(35, Alice);
            Person Son = new Person(12, Johny);

            Mother.Name = "Lucy";  // Just changing the value afterwards

            if(Mother.Age > Son.Age)
            {
                int year = Mother.DateOfBirth();
                Console.WriteLine("Mom was born in {0}.", year);
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

It's just an idea, it definitely doesn't work. But more than anything else it would help me if you can correct it to the working example...

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In its current form this question isn't good and will likely get closed. Please focus on something specific you have trouble with. –  Shadow Wizard Jan 31 '13 at 13:44
    
You should ask about specific compilation errors that you get and do not know how to fix. –  juharr Jan 31 '13 at 13:45
    
Public the members of Person; change the round braces to curly and name the members on instance creation. You've done. I posted the answer. –  Ken Kin Jan 31 '13 at 13:50
    
@ShadowWizard I don't understand the concept of classes at all. I know that for me the best way of understanding the basics is to see a correction of my work. I'm sorry if that doesn't meet the expectations of this site... –  Jeyekomon Jan 31 '13 at 13:55
add comment

closed as not a real question by Rafal, Richard Friend, Jack, dgvid, Frank van Puffelen Jan 31 '13 at 14:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
class Person
{
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Person(int age, string name)
    {
        Age = age;
        Name = name;
    }

    public int DateOfBirth()
    {
        return 2013 - Age;
    }
}

        class Program
        {
            public static void Main()
            {
                Person Mother = new Person(35, "Alice");
                Person Son = new Person(12, "Johny");

                Mother.Name = "Lucy";  // Just changing the value afterwards

                if (Mother.Age > Son.Age)
                {
                    int year = Mother.DateOfBirth();
                    Console.WriteLine("Mom was born in {0}.", year);
                }
            }
        }

Some useful links: properties, constructor

share|improve this answer
    
I'd pay for such help! :-) Thank you. –  Jeyekomon Jan 31 '13 at 14:13
add comment
using System;

namespace Introduction_to_classes {
    class Person {
        public int Age;
        public string Name;

        public int DateOfBirth() {
            return 2013-Age;
        }
    }

    class Program {
        public static void Main() {
            Person Mother=new Person {
                Age=35,
                Name="Alice"
            };

            Person Son=new Person {
                Age=12,
                Name="Johny"
            };

            Mother.Name="Lucy";  // Just changing the value afterwards

            if(Mother.Age>Son.Age) {
                int year=Mother.DateOfBirth();
                Console.WriteLine("Mom was born in {0}.", year);
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I could be wrong, but I don't 'think' that you can initialize fields that way. I think they have to be properties. But someone please correct me if I'm mistaken about that. –  Brandon Moore Jan 31 '13 at 13:48
    
@BrandonMoore You can initialize fields, it's just that you typically shouldn't have public fields in the first place. –  juharr Jan 31 '13 at 13:51
    
No suspecting. I've compiled the code as well. –  Ken Kin Jan 31 '13 at 13:53
    
@BrandonMoore You can initialize fields that way, but only as long as you have either not defined any constructors, or defined a constructor that takes 0 arguments. And you can only initialize public or internal fields that way (I think) –  Nolonar Jan 31 '13 at 14:11
    
@KenKin Your answer helped me, thank you. I'm doing my best but as a beginner I do have troubles with the easy things... –  Jeyekomon Jan 31 '13 at 14:22
show 2 more comments

The problem is that you're referring to a constructor that doesn't exist:

Person Mother = new Person(35, Alice);

The first argument here is an int, the second should be a string as far as I understand. But a string literal should be marked with double quotes, so that line should be:

Person Mother = new Person(35, "Alice");

Same for the following line.

Now you probably want a constructor that takes types of these arguments and you want to save these values to the new object, I assume. So, add this in your Person class:

public Person(int a, string n)
{
    this.Age = a;
    this.Name = n;
}

And, finally, you should make your Age and Name fields accessible to the other class, by marking them internal or public:

    public int Age;
    public string Name;

After that, you should be good to go.

share|improve this answer
    
Except that the DatOfBirth method and both fields are private. –  juharr Jan 31 '13 at 13:49
    
@juharr I don't know for sure what's the default modifier for C# because I always specify them explicitly, but I think it's internal, not private. In this case, internal should be fine. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Jan 31 '13 at 13:55
1  
If it is outside of a class it's internal, inside it's private. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173121.aspx –  juharr Jan 31 '13 at 13:59
    
@juharr +1, you're absolutely correct. I've edited my answer to include this. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Jan 31 '13 at 14:02
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First of all: new Person(35, "Alice") implies that class Person defines a constructor public Person(int age, string name). Alternatively, you'll have to call new Person() { Age = 35, Name = "Alice" } which only works as long as you have not defined a constructor, or have defined a constructor that takes 0 arguments, such as public Person() (notice how I put "Alice" within quotation marks? That's because you didn't define a string called Alice, so Alice is an unknown object)

Next we have Mother.Name = "Lucy", which won't work, because Name is not discoverable. The class Person does define a Name, but since you didn't specify an access modifier, such as public or private, class Program doesn't even know it exists and thus cannot access it. So you have to use public string Name instead of string Name. It is also considered to be good style to always specify your access modifier. The same applies to public int Age and public int DateOfBirth() as well.

To know more about access modifiers refer to http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173121.aspx

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