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Not sure whether this is a bug in the package or due to some other cause, but here we go.

I'm using the following package to find the largest eigenvalue and its corresponding eigenvector over a symmetric matrix of similarity scores (10x10 in size):

scipy.sparse.linalg.eigen.arpack.eigsh

, like so:

scipy.sparse.linalg.eigen.arpack.eigsh(mymatrix, 1, which='LM')

Now the question I have is that when I run it several times (using same matrix, settings etc.), sometimes the values in the eigenvectors are positive, and sometimes negative (see Run 3).

Does anyone know why this might be, or is it a bug? There doesn't seem to be a pattern to it, but it only happens when I run the code without closing Python after each iteration (i.e hitting F5 after each run).

### Run 1: ###
[[-0.31056873]
[-0.31913092]
[-0.3149287 ]
[-0.32262921]
[-0.32190688]
[-0.31292658]
[-0.32424732]
[-0.31885208]
[-0.31808024]
[-0.298174  ]]

### Run 2: ###
[[-0.31056873]
[-0.31913092]
[-0.3149287 ]
[-0.32262921]
[-0.32190688]
[-0.31292658]
[-0.32424732]
[-0.31885208]
[-0.31808024]
[-0.298174  ]]

### Run 3:###
[[ 0.31056873]
[ 0.31913092]
[ 0.3149287 ]
[ 0.32262921]
[ 0.32190688]
[ 0.31292658]
[ 0.32424732]
[ 0.31885208]
[ 0.31808024]
[ 0.298174  ]]

### Run 4: ###
[[-0.31056873]
[-0.31913092]
[-0.3149287 ]
[-0.32262921]
[-0.32190688]
[-0.31292658]
[-0.32424732]
[-0.31885208]
[-0.31808024]
[-0.298174  ]]

It's not a major problem, but I don't like the uncertainty in my code ;-)

Many thanks in advance,

Martyn

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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is actually a math question.

But the reason is that there's an arbitrary phase when you calculate eigenvectors. You're solving Ax = bx for x. The equation is invariant under multiplication by a (possibly ocmplex) phase.

As to why it happens in a (seemingly) random fashion, I don't know. But I'm pretty sure it's not a bug.

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ARPACK uses the (implicitly restarted) Anoldi method to find eigenvalues. Note that the first step of that algorithm is "Start with an arbitrary vector q1 with norm 1"; presumably, depending on the starting point (which may be chosen randomly) it converges to a different solution. –  Dougal Jan 31 '13 at 15:35
    
Nice, thanks...+1 for you :) To the OP: if you want to fix your issue, you'll have to implement your own convention. For example, if the first entry is negative, multiply all entries in the vector by -1. Anyway, not sure what you're doing, but it sounds like you may be thinking about PCA, in which case you shouldn't worry, because there you're only interested in the absolute squares of the eigenvector components, as far as I remember. –  BenDundee Jan 31 '13 at 16:55
    
Thanks guys for a good explanation and subsequent comments, phew! I thought something bad happened ;-) –  Martyn Jan 31 '13 at 19:23
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