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Property descriptor object of length property shows configurable: true, writable:true and enymerable:true but it behaves like read only.

I knew that readonly feature can only be implemented by PDO(property descriptor object).

Can someone give any clue? How is this readonly?

var nodeList = document.getElementsByName('demo');

nodeList.length; //3
nodeList.length = 6;
nodeList.length; //3

Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(nodeList,'length')
Object
configurable: true
enumerable: true
value: 3
writable: true
__proto__: Object
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3  
DOM elements have a native implementation. It's possible that one restricts their behaviour above what Javascript's reflection metadata tells you. – millimoose Jan 31 '13 at 14:14
up vote 4 down vote accepted

length is read-only, as per http://www.w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-3-Core/core.html#ID-536297177

Indeed that display is misleading, but that's because it's a host object, so it doesn't have to behave like a native object like we're used to. That is worth a bug report though, since the display should match the behaviour as closely as possible, especially in obvious cases like this.

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1  
Exactly - seems to be a bug. Should vary with Javascript engine. Do we expect a different behaviour if tried in a different browser? – sbose Jan 31 '13 at 14:24
2  
In Opera, it's a getter/setter property. – Bergi Jan 31 '13 at 14:56

The DOM spec defines length as readonly:

interface NodeList {
  getter Node? item(unsigned long index);
  readonly attribute unsigned long length;
};

It may seem that getOwnPropertyDescriptor shouldn't say that it's writable. However, NodeList instances are host objects:

object supplied by the host environment to complete the execution environment of ECMAScript

Therefore, they can have special behaviors. In fact, this one is enforced by ECMAScript:

If a property is described as a data property and it may return different values over time, then either or both of the [[Writable]] and [[Configurable]] attributes must be true even if no mechanism to change the value is exposed via the other internal methods.

Since getElementsByName returns a live collection, length may change, so [[Writable]] or [Configurable]] must be true. Your implementation chooses both.

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