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In my company we use an Oracle database. I've noticed everybody writes their queries like this:

SELECT p.name, p.id, o.issued_date
FROM orders o, products p
WHERE o.productid = p.id;

What is the database doing in a situation like this? Making a Cartesian product and then selecting only certain rows? That just doesn't sound right.

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9  
Everyone in your company should be fired. –  JonH Jan 31 '13 at 14:39
2  
No. Databases are typically smart about how they implement such joins. But you should still always use proper ANSI join syntax. –  Gordon Linoff Jan 31 '13 at 14:40
    
@JonH Unfortunately this syntax is widely used in Oracle world. –  Luc M Jan 31 '13 at 14:44
    
@LucM - To me its also about readability. –  JonH Jan 31 '13 at 14:45
1  
Oracle's always been smart enough to recognize a join without having to be explicitly told about it. Mind you, I do prefer the new JOIN syntax. I guess it depends on what you were brought up with. –  Jeffrey Kemp Feb 1 '13 at 4:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What is the database doing in a situation like this?

The same as when you specify an ANSI join:

SELECT *
FROM orders o
JOIN products p ON o.productid = p.id

I've noticed everybody writes their queries like this [...]

It looks like lots of people in your company got many years of experience in Oracle! I bet they also use (+) notation for outer joins. This was the only syntax supported by Oracle prior to the 9i release.

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I'm so glad that notation is no longer used. I never liked it. –  N1tr0 Jan 31 '13 at 15:20
    
@N1tr0; the notation is still used. Oracle just now also supports the ANSI join syntax. There are actually still a few problems with the implementation of ANSI and the older OUTER JOINs sometimes have to be used in complex queries with multiple JOINs. –  Ben Jan 31 '13 at 18:29
    
Thanks for the info! –  N1tr0 Jan 31 '13 at 19:08

Actually this is the oldest ANSI standard for inner joins. People in the other replies mentioned that it is not ANSI syntax, but it is not quite right. Construct like

SELECT p.name, p.id, o.issued_date
FROM orders o, products p
WHERE o.productid = p.id;

adheres to ANSI 88 standard of SQL (now called Implicit Join Form). However it has been superseeded by a newer ANSI 92 explicit form of inner, outer and cross joins:

-- Inner join
SELECT p.name, p.id, o.issued_date
FROM orders o [INNER] JOIN products p
ON o.productid = p.id
WHERE (residual conditions);

-- Outer joins:
SELECT p.name, p.id, o.issued_date
FROM orders o LEFT|RIGHT|FULL [OUTER] JOIN products p
ON o.productid = p.id
WHERE (residual conditions);

-- Explicit corss join:
SELECT p.name, p.id, o.issued_date
FROM orders o CROSS JOIN products p
WHERE (residual conditions);

This is exactly because the prior syntax was misleading and prone to errors due to the fact that the join condition easily got mixed with residual conditions and could be mistakenly lost. This is why it is highly recommended to use the explicit syntax.

Square brackets [] indicate 'noise' (optional) keywords, vertical bar | indicates 'OR' (you can put there either LEFT or RIGHT or FULL, not all of them). I hope this helps.

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It is to this:

SELECT 
     *
FROM 
     Orders o
INNER JOIN 
     Products p
ON
     p.id=o.ProductID

Note you should never SELECT *... list the columns you need. You should also explicitly state the type of join (inner, left, right, outer). This is the proper way to implement a join and is ANSI syntax.

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SELECT * was just an example... –  Robotron Jan 31 '13 at 14:42
    
Right but it's worth noting to others who may come to the site. It is a bad practice and commonly used by developers who think that it's just easier. –  JonH Jan 31 '13 at 14:43
    
Never is still wrong. –  user unknown Feb 1 '13 at 15:53
    
NEVER NEVER NEVER you should NEVER SELECT * no matter the circumstances. –  JonH Feb 1 '13 at 16:27

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