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Seeing that a 2 b-tree's could have the same values, yet a different shape, is there an algorithm to go through the values and compare if both tree's have the same keys?

The point is to be able to bail out if they contain different keys (as soon as possible).

A recursive algorithm probably won't work unless you are performing a lookup in both b-tree's at the same time I'm guessing.

I've seen algorithm's that traverse a b-tree, but I don't want to traverse both, and then compare the keys, I want something smarter that will bail out as early as possible if there is a difference.

Basically the function returns true/false.

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2 Answers 2

The fundamental technique is to somehow have an object that represents the current point in the in-order traversal. Once you have two of those, one for each instance of the tree, you just keep pumping them for the next key, and the first time the two return a different next key, you're done.

In C# you'd use yield return to make a traversal that yields up a single key at a time, and keeps track of where it is in the tree. You can then pass two of those to SequenceEquals, and it will bail out as soon as it encounters the first difference. In Java you'd have to build that mechanism yourself, but it's not that hard to do.

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The issue is how to iterate. For example, iterating both in DFS is unlikely to yield the correct result. In binary tree you would need an in-order traversal, and iterate two binary trees in order. In B-Tree, there should be some modification on it I assume. –  amit Jan 31 '13 at 14:58
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@amit: I'm sorry, I am confused by your comment. DFS is a search technique, not a traversal technique. Obviously you need an in-order traversal; a post-order or pre-order traversal isn't going to do the right thing. I don't see what that has to do with searching the tree for a particular item. –  Eric Lippert Jan 31 '13 at 15:02
    
Note In-Order traversal can also vary in a B-tree, since you more then one child (recall that in a binary tree "in order" is because it is before traversing the right son and after traversing the left son). It is not that of a big issue to modify it to a B-tree but it might not be trivial for those who are not familiar with the technique. I meant pre-order obviously, not DFS, sorry for the confusion. –  amit Jan 31 '13 at 15:04
    
@Eric Lippert DFS and BFS are both search and traversal techniques. How else do you traverse a graph? We don't have level-order or in-order graph traversals, we have BFS and DFS. And since a tree is a simple graph DFS and BFS still apply. –  kasavbere Jan 31 '13 at 16:57
    
@kasavbere: It makes no sense to say that a traversal of a b-tree is a depth first search; b-trees are already sorted! You don't need to do a depth-first search. –  Eric Lippert Jan 31 '13 at 17:38

Assuming you mean a b-tree then all you need to do is iterate over both at once. Any deviation between either iterator will prove that their contents differ. It is unlikely you will find a better algorithm than that without collecting more details as you build the trees.

If you are not talking about the b-tree which is described as:

... a B-tree is a tree data structure that keeps data sorted and allows searches, sequential access, insertions, and deletions in logarithmic time.

then you need to sort it first then traverse it.

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The issue is how to iterate. For example, iterating both in DFS is unlikely to yield the correct result. In binary tree you would need an in-order traversal, and iterate two binary trees in order. In B-Tree, there should be some modification on it I assume. –  amit Jan 31 '13 at 14:57
    
Thus my caveat about it being a "b-tree" as in In computer science, a B-tree is a tree data structure that keeps data sorted and allows searches, sequential access, insertions, and deletions in logarithmic time. thus it is intrinsically sorted so in-order iteration is trivial. –  OldCurmudgeon Jan 31 '13 at 15:00
    
I agree it CAN be done, but it is not trivial. You need to do a modification to the in-order traversal of a binary tree (traverse(left), op(root), traverse(right)) to make the traversal follow the "sorted" order. I agree it is not complicated, but it is not trivial to one that is not familiar with this technique. –  amit Jan 31 '13 at 15:07
    
Then your question should be How do I iterate a b-tree in-order and you need a reference to the B-Tree code. I see several on-line and all should be comparatively easy to iterate. Perhaps a new question would be a good idea. –  OldCurmudgeon Jan 31 '13 at 15:41

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