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if( currentTimeslot.isEmpty()){
         System.out.println("Do stuff");
            }

How come I get a NullPointerException? How do I check whether a string is NULL and do stuff if it is? Whenever currentTimeslot is equals to NULL I get the error. Here is the console message:

Exception in thread "AWT-EventQueue-0" java.lang.NullPointerException
at PM.ui.MainFrame.getJPanelTopMenu(MainFrame.java:382)
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Goran Jovic, Ed Heal, Mark, ig0774, Graviton Feb 6 '13 at 5:54

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
What language is this? – Jan Hančič Jan 31 '13 at 15:10
    
it's java language – Blaiz Jan 31 '13 at 15:17

Try the following

    if( currentTimeslot == null){
             System.out.println("Do stuff");
   }
share|improve this answer

You are probably new to Java, In Java an object can be null which means no methods are approachable on that Object, thus NullPointerException will be thrown each time you try to access a method of a null Object.

To resolve this you should check the Object is not null by

        if ( currentTimeslot != null ){
            ....
        }

Since all Java object extends from java.lang.Object this check is relevant for any type not only String.

share|improve this answer
    
he wants to do something when it IS null, not the other way round. – Obl Tobl Jan 31 '13 at 15:22

An important thing to ask yourself: Are null and empty logically equivalent for what you're doing?

If so, you might want to use this:

if (currentTimeslot == null || currentTimeslot.isEmpty()) {
    // Do stuff
}

If the first half of that statement evaluates to true, Java won't bother with the second half, thus protecting you from the null-pointer exception.

Another approach would be to normalize your data; if you want null and an empty string to be treated as the same thing, just do something like this early in the code:

if (currentTimeslot == null) currentTimeslot = "";

Now you don't have to defensively null-check every time you use it.

As to why you're getting the exception: in Java, all objects (any variable that isn't a primitive type like int, boolean, etc.) is null until you initialize* it. If you try to access any methods or fields of that object, you'll get a null-pointer exception because you're asking the code to access something that doesn't actually exist yet. In Java, you either want to make sure your objects get initialized to something early or do a lot of defensive null-checking (either with if (variable != null) { ... } or try { ... } catch (NullPointerException npe) { ... } blocks) to prevent exactly the problem you're running into.

*-- Initialize it with something other than null, of course.

share|improve this answer
    
A catch block for NullPointerException may hide the original error, causing other, more subtle problems later on. See Strict Exceptions on PMD and see Poor Error Handling: Program Catches NullPointerException on HP Fortify Taxonomy: Software Security Errors. – Paul Vargas Jan 31 '13 at 15:45
    
@PaulVargas: Depends on what you fill in for "...". And I'd honestly be more concerned about NullPointerException catching a DIFFERENT error from what I was expecting. (EG, I set it up to handle objectA being null, but it's actually objectB throwing the error.) I was trying to cover all my bases in NPE options, but yeah, I'd rank it a third-best option behind normalizing your data and if-blocks for specific variables, precisely for these reasons. – BlairHippo Jan 31 '13 at 15:54

If you're getting a null pointer exception, it could be because currentTimeslot is null. So you should first check if it's not null and then invoke one of its methods:

if(currentTimeslot!=null && currentTimeslot.isEmpty())...
share|improve this answer

I suggest you let go of most string empty and null testing. Apache Commons Lang StringUtils solved most string manipulation (is null, is empty, is not empty, is all blank, etc.) long ago.

Download apache commons lang and use it.

Your code will become something like this:

if (StringUtils.isEmpty(currentTimeslot))
{
   ... react to an empty currentTimeslot .
}
else // currentTimeslot  is not emty (that includes not null).
{
   .. react to a not empt currentTimeslot 
}
share|improve this answer
if(currentTimeslot==null){
    System.out.println("whatever");
}

The command currentTimeslot.isEmpty() is the same with currentTimeslot.equals(""), which is NOT considered as null, it's just empty. If you want to check if it's null or it's emptly, you have to put the one if-case into the other, like this:

if(currentTimeslot==null){
    System.out.println("null string");
}
else{
    if(currentTimeslot.isEmpty()){
       System.out.println("empty string");}
     }

If the commands you want to put are many to copy them twice, you could put them into a function and call the function, or alternatively use a boolean variable that becomes true in both cases, and then check if the boolean variable is true for doing the rest of the commands, like this:

 boolean empty;
if(currentTimeslot==null){
    System.out.println("null string");
    empty=true;
}
else{
    if(currentTimeslot.isEmpty()){
       empty=true;
       System.out.println("empty string");}
     }
 if(empty){
 ....
 .... }

Hope this helps :)

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