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I was wondering if which of the following patterns are considered to be more "correct".

The first example sets the value of private data member length by calling a void member function that implicitly takes arguments. The second example sets the value of length by assigning it to the return value of the member function that explicitly takes an argument.

It seems that the second method makes the code clearer, since you know when and how the private member is getting set, where the first requires a trace of the code to verify what and how a value is being assigned. The second method also seems like it would allow for better reuse down the road because it could operate in any class/context (since the arguments and return type are explicit).

The first method is quicker, and if used throughout the entire class (for private member functions) can save some coding, however I'm not sure if this will bite me down the road ?

Thank you for the insight and clearing this up for me.

class MyDataType
{
   private int length;
   private string content;
   private char[] buffer;

   public MyDataType(str) 
   {
      content = str;

      calculateLength();

      buffer = new char[length+1];

      for(int i=0; i < length; i++)
         buffer[i] = content[i];

      buffer[i] = NULL;
   }

   private void calculateLength()
   {
      int i = 0;

      while(content[i++] != NULL) {}  // i know, buffer overflow...

      length = i;
   }
}

class MyDataType
{
   private int length;
   private string content;
   private char[] buffer;

   public MyDataType(str) 
   {
      content = str;

      length = calculateLength(content);

      buffer = new char[length+1];

      for(int i=0; i < length; i++)
         buffer[i] = content[i];

      buffer[i] = NULL;
   }

   private int calculateLength(string s)
   {
      int i = 0;

      while(s[i++] != NULL) {}

      return i;
   }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why is the second method not static in the second example, ie doesn't seem to use any of the other variables within the class? – KingCronus Jan 31 '13 at 15:21
    
This is just an example I whipped up for the sake of argument. So by asking me if its static (which, yes, I suppose it could be), are you implying that the first example is correct ? Just b/c a method could be static, should it be ? – Samus Arin Jan 31 '13 at 15:24
    
In your first example you have the getLength method setting the private member variable and not returning anything. Typically a getX method is expected to return X. Perhaps it should be renamed. – Tom Jan 31 '13 at 15:27
1  
In my opinion an instance method should only be an instance method if it either a) uses the instance or b) changes the instance. For length I would personally have a get accessory on a property...so neither of your approaches, but I'm guessing you have oversimplified the problem so much that it no longer makes sense! – KingCronus Jan 31 '13 at 15:27
    
... sorry, getLength is not a setter, I changed it to calculateLength. Its intended to be an internal "utility" function, not a getter... – Samus Arin Jan 31 '13 at 15:31
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In terms of readability and flexibility the second example wins out.

The advantage to using the second example is that you are essentially just delegating some work in the constructor to a method. This is easy to read and won't easily break in the future if, for instance, someone calls the private calculateLength() method without expecting the instance variables to change.

In the first example the calculateLength() method is operating on the member variables in a non-transparent way to the constructor which makes it less readable and more prone to be brittle in the way described above.

share|improve this answer
    
This has been coming up so often lately, and being in a rush, I've been going with example one's format. It just seems wrong and dirty. However I wanted to get the general consensus here. Thanks, much appreciated. – Samus Arin Jan 31 '13 at 15:41
    
Oh, thats a real good point about the unexpected state change. I've been thinking in terms of specialized, single use functions, however good code is reused in more than one place, and will definitely come up (a private member could easily be used in two different places for different reasons I suppose). – Samus Arin Jan 31 '13 at 15:48
    
Now that I think back, I think the main reason I've been going with example 1 is b/c say you got like 5+ data member, all private, that need to be set with some data. Its real easy to just write a void SetData() function instead of SetData(ref List a1, ref List a2, ...) – Samus Arin Jan 31 '13 at 15:52
    
@SamusArin That's the main purpose for setters. But setters are conventionally written in a way that you can make no mistake about what it's doing to the private member i.e. setX is going to set X. Those types of setters would be perfectly fine to call from you constructor in terms of readability. The way the calculateLength method is named the effects are not as clear though. – Tom Jan 31 '13 at 15:59
    
@SamusArin Would you mind marking one of the answers as correct? – Tom Mar 4 '13 at 20:37

I would say the second is more appropriate, but the first works.

Usually getters are public, anywhere within a class you can access a private variable, doesn't make sense to have a getter that gets a private or protected variable in the same class. If it were protected and you could pass functionality to subclasses of your class.

It depends on what you want to do with the variable. If the value isn't going to change, I would just move the private calculateLength() method to the constructor. If you have to recalculate it then I guess I can see either the void or private doing pretty much the same thing. I feel that the second is clearer because you know exactly where the calculateLength() method is returning, but in the first it it is ambiguous to whether it is doing anything at all. It's better style to do the second.

share|improve this answer
    
... my bad, I changed getLength() to calculateLength(), since it wasn't intended to be a getter, but an internal utility method. Definitely misleading, thanks for pointing out. – Samus Arin Jan 31 '13 at 15:30

Why not embed the getLength() function content into the constructor, and do the copying simultaneously? You will save yourself another loop. Other than that, I am pretty sure it does not matter much. Just go with the flow, start with a method, and then modify in the future if you see fit.

share|improve this answer
    
This isn't real code, but an example to illustrate the points of my question. – Samus Arin Jan 31 '13 at 15:27
1  
When working with large scale systems you need to consider changes in the future. You have to make design decisions that will ease the change later in your system. Today it's writing one method, then it turns to a class, then it turns into a package. Once it gets large enough changing things in an essential class will break many of the others, making it a pain to go back and refactor. – Raufio Jan 31 '13 at 15:41

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