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this snippet should be fairly self-explanatory:

XDocument xd = ....
using (FileStream fs = new FileStream("test.txt", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite))
{
  using (TextWriter tw = new StreamWriter(fs))
  {
    xd.Save(tw);
  }
  fs.Flush();
  fs.SetLength(fs.Position);
}

I want to serialize my XDocument to a stream using a TextWriter and then truncate the stream after the end of it. Unfortunately, the Save() operation seems to close the stream so my Flush() call generates an Exception.

In the real world, I'm not actually serializing to a file but some other kind of stream outside my control, so it's not a simple as just deleting the file first.

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Andy keep in mind that when wrapping code around a using clause that once your process has left the using( ) { } block , objects are automatically disposed and underlying objects closed – MethodMan Jan 31 '13 at 15:45
    
Andy just curious can you show how / where you are using XDocument xd = .... ? – MethodMan Jan 31 '13 at 15:53
up vote 2 down vote accepted

you need to do this if you want to flush the stream

using (FileStream fs = new FileStream("test.txt", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite))
{
  using (TextWriter tw = new StreamWriter(fs))
  {
    tw.Flush();
    xd.Save(tw);
    fs.SetLength(fs.Position);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you might need to call xd.Flush() just after the xd.Save() otherwise it might not have flushed its buffer to fs. – Matthew Watson Jan 31 '13 at 15:44
    
good catch I will update that my mistake when copying his code – MethodMan Jan 31 '13 at 15:46
    
@MatthewWatson: I think you meant tw.Flush(). – Jim Mischel Jan 31 '13 at 15:50
    
Thanks. I had already figured that I needed to move the SetLength inside the outer "using". I think I must have had a mental block not realising it had to be inside the inner one too :-) – Andy Feb 1 '13 at 7:30
    
That tw.Flush() should be after xd.Save(tw). – Jim Mischel Feb 1 '13 at 13:57

Use this overload of the StreamWriter constructor. Note the last parameter: You can tell it to leave the stream open.

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Thanks for this - It's not the answer I was looking for but I didn't know about that overload and this is definitely something I will use in the future – Andy Feb 1 '13 at 7:32

Are you sure that Save closes the stream? The TextWriter is being closed at the end of the using. Perhaps this will work:

using (FileStream fs = new FileStream("test.txt", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite))
{
  var TextWriter tw = new StreamWriter(fs);
  try
  {
    xd.Save(tw);
    tw.Flush();
    fs.SetLength(fs.Position);
  }
  finally
  {
    tw.Dispose();
  }
}

Note that I flush the TextWriter, which also causes a flush of the underlying stream. Just flushing the FileStream might not include the data that's still buffered in the TextWriter.

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