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Is there any difference between (list f 1 2) and (f 1 2)?

If yes, then is (f 1 2) equivalent to ((f 1) 2) (currying)?

If yes, then is (a b) mean "add b to the end of list a"?

If yes, then what append function is for?

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3 Answers 3

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Is there any difference between (list f 1 2) and (f 1 2)?

Yes: (list f 1 2) calls the function list with the arguments f, 1 and 2, which creates a list containing those elements. (f 1 2) calls the function f with the arguments 1 and 2, which does whatever f was defined to do.

is (f 1 2) equivalent to ((f 1) 2) (currying)?

No. Functions in Lisp aren't curried automatically. If you call a function as (f 1 2) it must be a real binary function, not a curried function.

is (a b) mean "add b to the end of list a"?

No, it means "call the function a with the argument b".

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(list 1 2 3) is a Lisp form which computes a fresh list of three values, the values of 1, 2 and 3.

(1 2 3) is a list and computes to an error, since the first element is a number, not a function. As a quoted list, it would be a literal list of the elements 1, 2 and 3.

(list f 1 2) calls the function list on the results of evaluating f, 1 and 2. f is a variable and evaluation takes its value. 1 and 2 are numbers which evaluate to themselves. It returns a fresh list of three elements.

(f 1 2) calls the function f on the values of evaluating 1 and 2, which are evaluating to themselves.

((f 1) 2) is not valid in Lisp. Some Lisp dialects, like Scheme, allow that. In Lisp the first element in a function form has to be a function name (or in Common Lisp a lambda form).

(a b) means call the function a on the value of evaluating b, which evaluates to the value of the variable b.

append is for appending lists.

Also no, 'Lisp' does not support currying.

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Yes, there's a clear difference between (list f 1 2) and (f 1 2):
* The first evaluates to (#the value of <f># 1 2).
* The second evaluates to the result of f applied to 1 and 2.

Lisp functions don't do currying "out of the box", but they can be defined to do so.

(a b) means apply the function a to (the value of) b.

append is needed to append lists.

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Does this mean that (list f 1 2) is equivalent to (f' 1 2)? –  Suzan Cioc Jan 31 '13 at 16:06
1  
No. It is similar to '(f 1 2), but the f is not evaluated here. (f' 1 2) still evaluates a function called f'. –  Mark Hurd Jan 31 '13 at 21:07
    
If we're talking about Common Lisp, (list f 1 2) contains a list whose first element is the value of the variable f, not the function f. If there is no variable f, it's an error. –  sepp2k Feb 1 '13 at 4:19
    
@sepp2k Fair enough. I'm more used to Lisp 1s. –  Mark Hurd Feb 1 '13 at 10:28

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