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Below is the output that I receive, and below that is my code. Any reasons why I'm getting this memory reference? BTW - indentation is correct in my program but I had difficulty posting it in stackoverflow

>>>Welcome to the Main Menu, Richard.
>>>Please select from the following options:
    >>>(1)Punch In
    >>>(2)Punch Out
    >>>(3)Exit
>>>(type 1, 2, or 3)   
>>><__main__.PunchCard instance at 0x7f5c2b799ea8>

And the code

import xlrd
import sys
data = xlrd.open_workbook('data.xls')
sheetname = data.sheet_names()
employee_sheet = data.sheet_by_index(0)

uid_list = [c.value for c in employee_sheet.col(0)]
last_list = [c.value for c in employee_sheet.col(1)]
first_list = [c.value for c in employee_sheet.col(2)]
username_list = [c.value for c in employee_sheet.col(3)]
password_list = [c.value for c in employee_sheet.col(4)]

class PunchCard:

    def idle_screen(self):
        sys.stderr.write("\x1b[2J\x1b[H")
        print "Press Enter to start PunchClock"
        raw_input()
        return self.user_login()

    def user_login(self):
        sys.stderr.write("\x1b[2J\x1b[H")
        userinput = raw_input("Please enter your username.\n> ")
        if userinput in username_list:
                user_index = username_list.index(userinput)
                self.user_first = first_list[user_index]
                user_password = raw_input("Welcome %s, please enter your password.\n> " % self.user_first)
        else:
                print "That is an incorrect username."
                raw_input("Press enter to re-enter your username.")
                return self.user_login()

        if user_password == password_list[user_index]:
                return self.main_menu()
        else:
                sys.stderr.write("\x1b[2J\x1b[H")
                print "You have entered an incorrect password.\nPress enter to try again, or type QUIT to return to previous menu."
                raw_input()
                return self.user_login()

    def main_menu(self):        
            sys.stderr.write("\x1b[2J\x1b[H")
            print "Welcome to the Main Menu, %s.\nPlease select from the following options:\n    (1)Punch In\n    (2)Punch Out\n    (3)Exit\n\n(type 1, 2, or 3)" % self.user_first 
            menu_input = raw_input(self)
            if menu_input == '1':
                print "punched in"
                raw_input("You clocked in at XX. Press enter to continue.")
                return self.main_menu()
            elif menu_input == '2':
                print "punched out"
                raw_input("You clocked out at XX. Press enter to continue.")
                return self.main_menu()
            elif menu_input == '3':
                return self.idle_screen()
            else:
                return self.main_menu()

s = PunchCard()
s.idle_screen()
share|improve this question
    
You should read up on flow control (e.g. while / for loop, start here) and you've misunderstood the purpose of the return statement. Python is not at all like BASIC GOTO SUBROUTINE, which is what this reminds of. –  isedev Jan 31 '13 at 16:12
    
I understand the concept of the BASIC GOTO SUBROUTINE - simply because I started with the Commodore 64. Are there any other resources available that are more "abstract" or summarize such flow control methods other than the official documentation? Do you know of, say, particular examples of code that would perform what you see to be my intended purpose through better use of flow control in Python? Any reference would be very helpful - the standard documentation oftentimes seems arcane, and I find it easier to write code manually and observe its behavior and then rewrite what I'm working on. –  webbm Jan 31 '13 at 16:43

1 Answer 1

Ok, based on your comment, I'll answer in more detail then. But please note, I am providing an example based on the your code (there are better ways to achieve the same result, but you'll just have to bite down and read the docs).

The high-level flow of your application is the following infinite loop: idle screen -> user login -> main menu -> idle screen. So this should be expressed directly:

s = PunchCard()
while True:
    s.idle_screen()
    s.user_login()
    s.main_menu()

Then, idle_screen should simply wait for input and return (exit method):

def idle_screen(self):
    sys.stderr.write("\x1b[2J\x1b[H")
    print "Press Enter to start PunchClock"
    raw_input()
    # method returns to caller at this point

user_login() should loop until a valid login occurs and return (exit method):

def user_login(self):
    While True:
        sys.stderr.write("\x1b[2J\x1b[H")
        userinput = raw_input("Please enter your username.\n> ")
        if userinput in username_list:
            user_index = username_list.index(userinput)
            self.user_first = first_list[user_index]
            user_password = raw_input("Welcome %s, please enter your password.\n> " % self.user_first)
    else:
            print "That is an incorrect username."
            raw_input("Press enter to re-enter your username.")
            continue # start of the beginning of the loop again

    if user_password == password_list[user_index]:
            return # exit method
    else:
            sys.stderr.write("\x1b[2J\x1b[H")
            print "You have entered an incorrect password.\nPress enter to try again, or type QUIT to return to previous menu."
            raw_input()
            # do nothing here (will loop again)
            # Note your prompt mentions "QUIT" but you don't handle it ;)
            # Current logic means the login loop continues until a valid login occurs

Finally, main_menu loops until the user quits and the method returns (and everything starts over with the top-level loop):

def main_menu(self):        
    While True:
        sys.stderr.write("\x1b[2J\x1b[H")
        print "Welcome to the Main Menu, %s.\nPlease select from the following options:\n    (1)Punch In\n    (2)Punch Out\n    (3)Exit\n\n(type 1, 2, or 3)" % self.user_first 
        menu_input = raw_input(self)
        if menu_input == '1':
            print "punched in"
            raw_input("You clocked in at XX. Press enter to continue.")
        elif menu_input == '2':
            print "punched out"
            raw_input("You clocked out at XX. Press enter to continue.")
        elif menu_input == '3':
            return

Hope that helps.

But still, bite down and read the docs :)

share|improve this answer
    
Much appreciated - question answered. I've been using some tutorials @ Github in combination with the official Python documentation in order to get more of a feel for the possibilities as well as more optimized flow. It was quite funny that you said BASIC, because a C64 is really where I left coding back when I was say, ten. My coding skills - with the exception of HTML and excel macros - really need some development - so I appreciate the advice and input. –  webbm Jan 31 '13 at 18:23
    
glad I could help... don't forget to accept the answer ;) –  isedev Jan 31 '13 at 21:06

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