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I have a PHP web service that I've discovered is passing my C# a SHA-1 encrupted value. The sample data that is passed to me is "8cb2237d0679ca88db6464eac60da96345513964" which I know translates to "12345".

How do I translate the hashed value back to "12345" with code similar to the following

public static string HashCode(string str)
{
string rethash = "";
try
{

      System.Security.Cryptography.SHA1 hash = System.Security.Cryptography.SHA1.Create();
       System.Text.ASCIIEncoding encoder = new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding();
       byte[] combined = encoder.GetBytes(str);
       hash.ComputeHash(combined);
       rethash = Convert.ToBase64String(hash.Hash);
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
       string strerr = "Error in HashCode : " + ex.Message;
}
return rethash;
}
  • EDIT *

Here is some RUBY code that is also workig with "8cb2237d0679ca88db6464eac60da96345513964" and "12345"

require "digest/sha1"
class User
  attr_accessor :password
  def initialize(password)
    @password = hash_password(password)
  end
  def hash_password(password)
    Digest::SHA1.hexdigest(password)
  end
  def valid_password?(password)
    @password == hash_password(password)
  end
end
u = User.new("12345")
p u.password # => "8cb2237d0679ca88db6464eac60da96345513964"
p u.valid_password?("not valid") # => false
p u.valid_password?("12345") # => true
share|improve this question
1  
I'm no expert but I think the idea is that you're not supposed to do that :P –  pablochan Jan 31 '13 at 16:31
    
SHA-1 is a one-way hashing algorithm. The day it can be decrypted by any old C# application is the day it ceases to be useful. –  Ginosaji Jan 31 '13 at 16:35
    
When I search on the internet for "8cb2237d0679ca88db6464eac60da96345513964 12345" I see that a lot of people have the "12345" value all hashed to the same value. –  user2019423 Jan 31 '13 at 16:49
    
Of course it will always hash to the same value. And you can know specifically that 8cb2237d0679ca88db6464eac60da96345513964 is 12345. That isn't decrypting, though. There's no known/practical way to convert an arbitrary hashed value to the original value. –  Ginosaji Jan 31 '13 at 17:37

6 Answers 6

You can't decrypt SHA1 hash because it's a one way hash.

Another example of one way hashing is MD5

share|improve this answer
    
When I search on the internet for "8cb2237d0679ca88db6464eac60da96345513964 12345" I see that a lot of people have the "12345" value all hashed to the same value I have –  user2019423 Jan 31 '13 at 16:53
    
See my answer for why that is @user2019423 –  KingCronus Jan 31 '13 at 17:05

The ruby code that you posted doesn't appear to be reversing a hash.

What it seems to be doing is this:

Get the password text, hash it and store it.

Later, when it wants to check that the "user" entered the same password again, it gets the password text from the user, hashes it, and compares the hash value to the stored hash value.

This is a common way to store and check passwords. Instead of "dehashing" the stored value for comparison, you hash the new value and compare the two hash values.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I needed to understand. Thanks! –  user2019423 Jan 31 '13 at 17:40

12345 will always come out as 8cb2237d0679ca88db6464eac60da96345513964 with a straight hash.

This means that if you made a database of every possible result, you could in theory look up the result and from that see what the original input to the sha1 function was.

This is a security problem, with issues like Dictionary Attacks and Rainbow tables being possible (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainbow_table).

To get around that, you should never use an unsalted hash. i.e. you always customise your hash using a value known to you.

For example sha1("12345" + "mySalt").

Now your hash is easy for you to work out, but not the same as every other person in the world who has used sha1.

Technically speaking, you should also never reuse the same salt twice either, but that is a more complicated concept.

EDIT: As owlstead points out below, PBKDF2 and a random salt should be used, rather than a static one and a hash. Far better for security.

share|improve this answer
    
Got it... thanks! –  user2019423 Jan 31 '13 at 17:39
2  
Salts should be random, and you should not use a hash but a PBKDF such as PBKDF2. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jan 31 '13 at 17:49

Hashing is not a reversible operation, like encryption.

share|improve this answer
    
When I search on the internet for "8cb2237d0679ca88db6464eac60da96345513964 12345" I see that a lot of people have the "12345" value all hashed to the same value I have. –  user2019423 Jan 31 '13 at 16:47
    
@user2019423, it is true that 12345 always hashes to that value. It is also true that there may be other values that hash to that sha. The only way to "reverse" a hash is to hash all possible values and see which ones map to your input. –  Jim Counts Jan 31 '13 at 17:01

The code you are looking for is this

SHA1 sha = new SHA1CryptoServiceProvider();
ASCIIEncoding encoder = new ASCIIEncoding(); 
byte[] combined = encoder.GetBytes(pin);
string hash = BitConverter.ToString(sha.ComputeHash(combined)).Replace("-", "");

Where pin is the unhashed value, and hash is the value you want compaired

share|improve this answer

Hashing is not encryption. Hashing is one way, and is used in most cases to verify data integrity.

share|improve this answer
    
When I search on the internet for "8cb2237d0679ca88db6464eac60da96345513964 12345" I see that a lot of people have the "12345" value all hashed to the same value I have –  user2019423 Jan 31 '13 at 16:53
    
See my answer for why that is @user2019423 –  KingCronus Jan 31 '13 at 17:05

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