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This seems to be a very stupid question about casting, but...

I have the following setup:

There are a number of classes derivces from a main class. At some point in time and space I get an item, and want to handle it as object of subclass.

Asume:

class subClassA : mainclass 
class subClassB : mainclass 

Now I have some if to ask which class it is:

if(someObject is subClassA)
{
    subClassA aA = someObject as subClassA ;
}

While for most subClasses the correct object is returned, I get for one subClass a null-Object.

If I do the following:

if(someObject is subClassA)
{
    subClassA aA = someObject as subClassA ; // <- aA = null; someObject is shown in debugger as object of subClassA

    object test = someObject as subClassA; // <- object is not null
    // or 
    subClassA aB = (subClassA)someObject; // <- object is not null, shows the correct object
}

I have results in test and aB.

What I do not understand:

Why does as fail and the prefix cast succeed?


Now I'm completly lost.

if(someObject is subClassA)
{
    subClassA aA = someObject as subClassA ; // <- aA = null; someObject is shown in debugger as object of subClassA

    subClassA aB = someObject as subClassA ; // <- aB != null.
}

if(someObject is subClassA)
{
    subClassA aB = someObject as subClassA ; // <- aB != null.
}

The name aA is localy defined. Only one thread accesses the method. If I just rename aA it works.

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2  
Are you certain someObject itself is not null? –  D Stanley Jan 31 '13 at 16:34
1  
The only thing I could think of is that this has to do with a confused type? Are you possibly casting from a type of the same name, but different assembly version? –  Justin Pihony Jan 31 '13 at 16:36
    
-stanley I'm sure that someobject is not null - it shows entries and is cast correctly at later lines @pihony copied and pasted the type from the is to both other appearances. therefore all 3 ones should be the same. (that was the one i checked first). The funny thing is that i have used "as" as i have read that "as" should be up to 5 times faster. –  Offler Jan 31 '13 at 16:40
    
I think the code can't work the way you describe. Could you include short but complete sample code that shows your problem (including definitions of all classes etc.)? –  svick Jan 31 '13 at 17:39
2  
svick is correct; it should never be possible to have if(x is Y) { Y y = x as Y; } produce null for y. (Provided of course that x is not modified!) Please provide a small complete program that demonstrates what you're observing here. –  Eric Lippert Feb 1 '13 at 1:09

3 Answers 3

While in most cases the correct object is returned, I get sometimes a null-Object.

There's only one simple explanation for your problem. The someObject reference is being modified by another thread. You'll need to use the lock statement to protect it.

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the someObject is created within the thread which consumes it. Also if i look into the debugger i see no changes at the someobject. I meant with most cases: it is a form if(object is A){} else if(object is B){}else if(... most of the cases work, but only one tree "if(object is B)" does not work. In the case where it does not work i can get the correct object with the statement from kelsey's post (subClassA aA = (someObject as subClassA) ?? (subClassA)someObject;), but not with using "as" –  Offler Feb 1 '13 at 7:35

The scenario you are describing is confusing to say the least so could you try the following:

subClassA aA = (someObject as subClassA) ?? (subClassA)someObject;

Does that work (eg aA not null)?

You might want to refer to the following post for some details on as:

Casting vs using the 'as' keyword in the CLR

Still investigating some more but I am not sure how to recreate the scenario...

EDIT:

Reading a lot from some very smart people (Skeet and Lippert) trying to find the answer...

See is documenation:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/scekt9xw(v=vs.110).aspx

as / conversion documentation:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173105.aspx

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1  
Your characterization of the relationship between is, as and cast is not quite right. See onemancat's answer, or my article here: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/09/16/… –  Eric Lippert Feb 1 '13 at 1:07
    
@EricLippert I thought so... the whole question had me pretty confused assuming the OP's scenario was correct which it seems it can be but not as simply as he has stated. I was trying to prove something that is not possible when I should have instead been trying to disprove the OP's scenario. I have removed some of teh comments to not confuse the subject anymore than it already has :) –  Kelsey Feb 1 '13 at 3:47
    
subClassA aA = (someObject as subClassA) ?? (subClassA)someObject; => returns an aA which is not null. –  Offler Feb 1 '13 at 7:31
    
Okay. it is not working if i use the name of the original variable. The variable is created in the context, If I change the variable name also the normal "as" works. –  Offler Feb 1 '13 at 8:14

From MSDN, "as" is equivalent to:

expression is type ? (type)expression : (type)null

So, according to MSDN, in your code:

if(someObject is subClassA)
{
    subClassA aA = someObject as subClassA ;
}

is equivalent to

if(someObject is subClassA)
{
    subClassA aA = someObject is subClassA ? (subClassA)someObject : (subClassA)null ;
}

Since someObject is subClassA appears on both lines, the only thing I could think would be either that 1) someObject is actually null in some case; or, 2) you have a multi-threaded application and your code is not thread-safe (i.e., from time to time the "is" line is true, but by the time the "as" line is reached, the implicit "is" has become false.)

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2  
You can't have “null but compatible with some type”. There is only one null. –  svick Jan 31 '13 at 18:45
    
1) i go through the code step by step. the object someObject is not null before the "as" cast, and someObject is not null after the cast. 2) for sure it is a multi-threaded application. But: a) why shoudl this happen only with one "as" cast and not with the others (and always with the one) b) in paralell task view I do not the any other thread using neither object nor method, the object is only build within one thread and accessed from it. c) the statement of kelsey "X a = (someObject as X) ?? (X)someObject;" shows the correct result. (or the "(subClassA)" statement after the "as" statement. –  Offler Feb 1 '13 at 7:46

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