Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a question about foreach behavior in C#.

My custom class implements a custom GetEnumerator. This method returns another object that is implicitly convertible to string.

However if I do foreach(string s in customClass) it fails during run-time ("Unable to cast object of type .. to string").

However if I do string x = new B() it works like a charm.

NOTE: There is nothing in particular I need to achieve here, I just want to understand what is going on. I am particularly interested in this non-generic behavior.

Any ideas? What fundamental knowledge am I missing?

Code to replicate this:

public class A : IEnumerable
{
    #region IEnumerable Members

    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        yield return new B();
    }

    #endregion
}

public class B
{
    public static implicit operator string( B b )
    {
        return "to-stringed implicit";
    }
}

// CODE:

A a = new A();

// Works.
B b = new B();
string xxx = b;

// Doesnt work.
foreach( string str in a )
{
}
share|improve this question
1  
Your implicit operator on`B` is the door to hell ;) –  Tim Schmelter Jan 31 '13 at 16:39
1  
Section "The foreach statement" (8.8.4 of the C# 5.0 specification) - it covers exactly what is and is not performed in the foreach (as well as code it converted to). The document is generally in your "Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio XX.0\VC#\Specifications\YYYY" folder. –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 31 '13 at 16:56
    
@TimSchmelter I ve though I made it clear enough that this code has nothing to do with practical use. I just wanted to know, why implicit/explicit cast is not called in foreach. Maybe someone could let me know how to write questions more clearly so that people stop pointing out these things. –  NeverStopLearning Jan 31 '13 at 17:36
    
Also see ericlippert.com/2013/07/22/… –  nawfal Nov 29 '13 at 12:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your implicit conversion can only be used if the compiler sees it can be used at compile-time:

B b = new B();
string str = b;

It can't be used at run-time:

B b = new B();
object obj = b;
string str = obj; // will fail at run-time

Basically, this is because it would be far too expensive to look through all the possible conversions from obj to a string that might work. (See this Eric Lippert blog post).


Your IEnumerator returns objects, so calling foreach (string str in a) is trying to convert an object to a B at runtime.

var e = a.GetEnumerator();
e.MoveNext();
object o = e.Current;
string str = o; // will fail at run-time

If you instead use foreach(B item in a) { string str = item; ... }, the runtime conversion is from object to B (which works, because each object is a B), and the conversion from B to str can be made by the compiler.

var e = a.GetEnumerator();
e.MoveNext();
object o = e.Current;
B item = o;        // will work at run-time because o _is_ a B
string str = item; // conversion made by the compiler

A different way to fix this would be to make A implement IEnumerable<B> instead of just IEnumerable. Then, foreach (string str in a) translates more as

var e = a.GetEnumerator();
e.MoveNext();
B b = e.Current; // not object!
string str = b;  // conversion made by the compiler

so the compiler can make the conversion without you having to change your foreach loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Your answer is the only one that truly shows why is this happening. –  NeverStopLearning Jan 31 '13 at 17:46

The foreach method doesn't require you to implement IEnumerable. All that's required is that your class has a method called GetEnumerator:

public class A
{
    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        yield return new B();
    }
}

and then you could use it in a foreach:

A a = new A();
foreach (B str in a)
{
    Console.WriteLine(str.GetType());
}

But the foreach statement will not call the implicit operator. You will have to do this manually:

foreach (B item in a)
{
    string str = item;
    // use the str variable here
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the same fix I came up with when looking at this, and this may be a dumb question, but why doesn't it call the implicit operator? –  Gray Jan 31 '13 at 16:51
    
Because that's how the designers of the C# language decided to implement it. I am not one of them so cannot give you the exact reason. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 31 '13 at 16:53
    
@DarinDimitrov I tried to give reason why conversion does not happen based on C# spec... moving next step and explaining why particular set of rules was picked for the spec is where it gets "can't give exact reason" :) –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 31 '13 at 17:20
    
Thank you. I am essentially asking for why is this happening, not for how to fix it (as you suggest to do manual convert). Good point about not having to implement IEnumerable though, I didnt know that. However it makes little difference i think as IEnumerable is only one method: GetEnumerator. –  NeverStopLearning Jan 31 '13 at 17:44

Based on "foreach statement" section in the C# specification (8.8.4 of the C# 5.0 specification) I believe your case falls into section where "enumerated type have GetEnumerable which returns proper object" - there is no implicit conversion to determine type of element (there are some in case there is no unique GetEnumerable on the class)

The collection type is X, the enumerator type is E, and the element type is the type of the Current property.

The foreach is translated in following code (removed try/finally) in your case:

// foreach( string str in items )
//    embedded-statement


IEnumerator enumerator = items.GetEnumerator();
while (enumerator.MoveNext()) 
  {
    string str = (string)(Object)enumerator.Current; // **
    embedded-statement
  }
}

Note that on line ** the type of object to be converted is Object (as it determined by result of enumerator.Current which is Object in case of non-generic IEnumerator. As you can see there is no mentioning of your B type that would allow your implicit conversion.

Note: Specification can be found in normal VS C# installation at following location: "Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio XX.0\VC#\Specifications\YYYY" (XX is your version 10 for VS2010, 11 for VS2012 and YYYY is locale 1033 for EN-US).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Somewhat more convoluted way of saying the same as Rawlings answer I belive. –  NeverStopLearning Jan 31 '13 at 17:47
    
@NeverStopLearning, Rawlings answer is definitely easier to read and correct... if you nick name is of any value I'd suggest to look at the specification itself to see explanation from the source (also covers how matching to non-interface version of GetEnumerator works). –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 31 '13 at 17:55
    
Indeed, thats why I have upvoted your answer even before too. I will check the specification - I never knew such document existed. –  NeverStopLearning Jan 31 '13 at 21:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.