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Some example i run into for a program that deals with menu..

He declared all the function before the main function as i understand should be, and then one of the function that is a void function was also mentioned inside the main:

char get_choice(void);
char get_first(void);
int get_int(void);
void count(void);
int main(void)
{
    int choice;
    void count(void);
    while ( (choice = get_choice()) != 'q')
    {
        switch (choice)
        {
            case 'a' : printf("Buy low, sell high.\n");
                break;
            case 'b' : putchar('\a'); /* ANSI */
                break;
            case 'c' : count();
                break;
            default : printf("Program error!\n");
                break;
        }
    }
    printf("Bye.\n");

...(functions implementations)

Can you please tell me why is that? tnx

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thanks for the edit @djechlin –  Nir Jan 31 '13 at 16:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

These are just declaration of the functions not definitions.Not too sure why count function is declared twice though.The declaration is just saying to the compiler that there is something there with this name.Perhaps the programmer forgot to define the method?

A declaration provides basic attributes of a symbol: its type and its name. A definition provides all of the details of that symbol--if it's a function, what it does; if it's a class, what fields and methods it has; if it's a variable, where that variable is stored.

eg declaration looks like this:

void count(void);

eg definition looks like this:

void count(void){

......

}
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No reason at all, this is just a pointless repetition of the prototype.

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Thanks allot @unwind –  Nir Jan 31 '13 at 16:45

Doesn't matter - wherever makes sense for your program. Obviously, if it's inside the main, then no other function before the actual function implementation will "know" what the function prototype is, which can have an impact.

I personally tend to implement the function before it is called, that way avoiding the problem of where to put the prototype [unless it goes in a headerfile, in which case that tends to solve the problem].

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thanks a bunch @ MatsPetersson –  Nir Jan 31 '13 at 16:47

Can you please tell me why is that? tnx

There is no why beyond it being a simple mistake; the author simply missed the redundant declaration. So long as both declarations are the same, it isn't an issue (although it's ugly and should be cleaned up).

FWIW, this is why I always define functions before they're used within the same file. The definition counts as a declaration, so there's only one prototype to worry about.

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