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Assume the following synchronous code:

try
{
    Foo();
    Bar();
    Fubar();
    Console.WriteLine("All done");
}
catch(Exception e) // For illustration purposes only. Catch specific exceptions!
{
    Console.WriteLine(e);
}

Now assume all these methods have an Async counterpart and I have to use those for some reason, so simply wrapping the whole thing in a new task is not an option.
How would I achieve the same behavior?
What I mean with "same" is:

  1. Execute a handler for the exception, if one is thrown.
  2. Stop execution of the following methods, if an exception is thrown.

The only thing I was able to come up with is horrible:

var fooTask = FooAsync();
fooTask.ContinueWith(t => HandleError(t.Exception),
                     TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
fooTask.ContinueWith(
    t =>
    {
        var barTask = BarAsync();
        barTask.ContinueWith(t => HandleError(t.Exception),
                             TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
        barTask.ContinueWith(
            t =>
            {
                var fubarTask = FubarAsync();
                fubarTask.ContinueWith(t => HandleError(t.Exception),
                                       TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
                fubarTask.ContinueWith(
                    t => Console.WriteLine("All done"),
                    TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
            }, 
            TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
    }, 
    TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);

Please note:

  • I need a solution that works with .NET 4, so async/await is out of the question. However, if it would work with async/await feel free to show how.
  • I don't need to use the TPL. If it is impossible with the TPL another approach would be OK, maybe with Reactive Extensions?
share|improve this question
2  
Don't suppose it'd be possible to write a helper method that takes a params Action[] parameter along with a complete/error handler from which it it builds all this nastiness for you? –  Chris Sinclair Jan 31 '13 at 16:46
    
@ChrisSinclair: Good idea. That's what I am going to do if there is no "real" solution... –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 31 '13 at 16:50
    
You also need to add a continuation for each task to handle Canceled, if any of the tasks are cancelable. –  Servy Jan 31 '13 at 16:53
    
@Servy: Let's assume they can't be cancelled. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 31 '13 at 16:54
    
@ChrisSinclair It wouldn't be an Action[], it would be a Task[]. Basically a ForEachAsync that incorporated exception handling. –  Servy Jan 31 '13 at 16:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Here's how it would work with async:

try
{
    await FooAsync();
    await BarAsync();
    await FubarAsync();
    Console.WriteLine("All done");
}
catch(Exception e) // For illustration purposes only. Catch specific exceptions!
{
    Console.WriteLine(e);
}

This would work on .NET 4.0 if you installed the (prerelease) Microsoft.Bcl.Async package.


Since you're stuck on VS2010, you can use a variant of Stephen Toub's Then:

public static Task Then(this Task first, Func<Task> next)
{
  var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
  first.ContinueWith(_ =>
  {
    if (first.IsFaulted) tcs.TrySetException(first.Exception.InnerExceptions);
    else if (first.IsCanceled) tcs.TrySetCanceled();
    else
    {
      try
      {
        next().ContinueWith(__ =>
        {
          if (t.IsFaulted) tcs.TrySetException(t.Exception.InnerExceptions);
          else if (t.IsCanceled) tcs.TrySetCanceled();
          else tcs.TrySetResult(null);
        }, TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously);
      }
      catch (Exception exc) { tcs.TrySetException(exc); }
    }
  }, TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously);
  return tcs.Task; 
}

You can use it as such:

var task = FooAsync().Then(() => BarAsync()).Then(() => FubarAsync());
task.ContinueWith(t =>
{
  if (t.IsFaulted || t.IsCanceled)
  {
    var e = t.Exception.InnerException;
    // exception handling
  }
  else
  {
    Console.WriteLine("All done");
  }
}, TaskContinuationOptions.ExcecuteSynchronously);

Using Rx, it would look like this (assuming you don't have the async methods already exposed as IObservable<Unit>):

FooAsync().ToObservable()
    .SelectMany(_ => BarAsync().ToObservable())
    .SelectMany(_ => FubarAsync().ToObservable())
    .Subscribe(_ => { Console.WriteLine("All done"); },
        e => { Console.WriteLine(e); });

I think. I'm not an Rx master, by any means. :)

share|improve this answer
    
@StephenCleary: Any ideas about an alternate way with .NET 4? –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 31 '13 at 17:04
2  
@DanielHilgarth: Stephen Toub has a blog post that would be helpful here; he implements a Then extension method for more natural sequential chaining of asynchronous methods. –  Stephen Cleary Jan 31 '13 at 17:11

Just for the sake of completeness, that's how I would implement the helper method suggested by Chris Sinclair:

public void RunSequential(Action onComplete, Action<Exception> errorHandler,
                          params Func<Task>[] actions)
{
    RunSequential(onComplete, errorHandler,
                  actions.AsEnumerable().GetEnumerator());
}

public void RunSequential(Action onComplete, Action<Exception> errorHandler,
                          IEnumerator<Func<Task>> actions)
{
    if(!actions.MoveNext())
    {
        onComplete();
        return;
    }

    var task = actions.Current();
    task.ContinueWith(t => errorHandler(t.Exception),
                      TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
    task.ContinueWith(t => RunSequential(onComplete, errorHandler, actions),
                      TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
}

This ensures that each subsequent task is only requested when the previous one completed successfully.
It assumes that the Func<Task> returns an already running task.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think something finally clicked up there for me if you know what I mean. Thanks for the implementation/question! –  Chris Sinclair Jan 31 '13 at 17:44
    
@ChrisSinclair: You are welcome. Thanks for the discussion! –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 31 '13 at 17:47

You should be able to create a method to combine two tasks, and only start the second if the first succeeds.

public static Task Then(this Task parent, Task next)
{
    TaskCompletionSource<object> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
    parent.ContinueWith(pt =>
    {
        if (pt.IsFaulted)
        {
            tcs.SetException(pt.Exception.InnerException);
        }
        else
        {
            next.ContinueWith(nt =>
            {
                if (nt.IsFaulted)
                {
                    tcs.SetException(nt.Exception.InnerException);
                }
                else { tcs.SetResult(null); }
            });
            next.Start();
        }
    });
    return tcs.Task;
}

you can then chain tasks together:

Task outer = FooAsync()
    .Then(BarAsync())
    .Then(FubarAsync());

outer.ContinueWith(t => {
    if(t.IsFaulted) {
        //handle exception
    }
});

If your tasks are started immediately you can just wrap them in a Func:

public static Task Then(this Task parent, Func<Task> nextFunc)
{
    TaskCompletionSource<object> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
    parent.ContinueWith(pt =>
    {
        if (pt.IsFaulted)
        {
            tcs.SetException(pt.Exception.InnerException);
        }
        else
        {
            Task next = nextFunc();
            next.ContinueWith(nt =>
            {
                if (nt.IsFaulted)
                {
                    tcs.SetException(nt.Exception.InnerException);
                }
                else { tcs.SetResult(null); }
            });
        }
    });
    return tcs.Task;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your answer. Just like the answer from Chris Sinclair, yours assumes that the tasks returned from the methods are not started. For most APIs, that is not true. The are already started inside the method. So, in your code - and in Chris' - the tasks run in parallel. And the whole thing will error out as soon as the first task is finished, because than it tries to start a task that is already running or finished. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 31 '13 at 17:41
    
@DanielHilgarth - Sorry, I didn't read his answer before posting. The obvious thing to do is just to use a Func<Task> instead, then you can do FooAsync().Then(BarAsync).Then(FubarAsync). –  Lee Jan 31 '13 at 18:20
    
Exactly. That's what I also did in my answer. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 31 '13 at 18:23

Now, I haven't really used the TPL much, so this is just a stab in the dark. And given what @Servy mentioned, perhaps this won't run completely asynchronously. But I figured I'd post it and if it's way off the mark, you can downvote me to oblivion or I can have it deleted (or we can just fix what needs fixing)

public void RunAsync(Action onComplete, Action<Exception> errorHandler, params Action[] actions)
{
    if (actions.Length == 0)
    {
        //what to do when no actions/tasks provided?
        onComplete();
        return;
    }

    List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>(actions.Length);
    foreach(var action in actions)
    {
        Task task = new Task(action);
        task.ContinueWith(t => errorHandler(t.Exception), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
        tasks.Add(task);
    }

    //last task calls onComplete
    tasks[actions.Length - 1].ContinueWith(t => onComplete(), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);

    //wire all tasks to execute the next one, except of course, the last task
    for (int i = 0; i <= actions.Length - 2; i++)
    {
        var nextTask = tasks[i + 1];
        tasks[i].ContinueWith(t => nextTask.Start(), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
    }

    tasks[0].Start();
}

And it would have usage like:

RunAsync(() => Console.WriteLine("All done"),
            ex => Console.WriteLine(ex),
            Foo,
            Bar,
            Fubar);

Thoughts? Downvotes? :)

(I definitely prefer async/await though)

EDIT: Based on your comments to take Func<Task>, would this be a proper implementation?

public void RunAsync(Action onComplete, Action<Exception> errorHandler, params Func<Task>[] actions)
{
    if (actions.Length == 0)
    {
        //what to do when no actions/tasks provided?
        onComplete();
        return;
    }

    List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>(actions.Length);
    foreach (var action in actions)
    {
        Func<Task> nextActionFunc = action;
        Task task = new Task(() =>
        {
            var nextTask = nextActionFunc();
            nextTask.ContinueWith(t => errorHandler(t.Exception), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
            nextTask.Start();
        });
        tasks.Add(task);
    }

    //last task calls onComplete
    tasks[actions.Length - 1].ContinueWith(t => onComplete(), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);

    //wire all tasks to execute the next one, except of course, the last task
    for (int i = 0; i <= actions.Length - 2; i++)
    {
        var nextTask = tasks[i + 1];
        tasks[i].ContinueWith(t => nextTask.Start(), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
    }

    tasks[0].Start();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That won't work in my scenario, because all I have are methods that return an already running task. So there is no synchronous action I could wrap in a new task. So your method really would need to take a params Func<Task>[] and work with that. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 31 '13 at 17:08
    
@DanielHilgarth What if the method took in Task instead of Action? –  Chris Sinclair Jan 31 '13 at 17:09
    
Wouldn't help, because that means all tasks would already be running at the time of the call to RunAsync, which is exactly what I don't want. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 31 '13 at 17:10
    
@DanielHilgarth As said in comments earlier, you should take in a Func<Task>. That function could return an already running task, or start a new task and return it. –  Servy Jan 31 '13 at 17:13
2  
@ChrisSinclair: No, it is not. It still iterates the tasks in one go. It seems to assume that the tasks returned by the delegates are not started. In my scenario - and in most, I guess - this is not the case. Please see my answer on how it works for me. Your solution will run the tasks in parallel and error out as soon as the first task is finished as it tries to start a task that is already running or finished. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 31 '13 at 17:40

What you have here is essentially a ForEachAsync. You want to run each async item, sequentially, but with some error handling support. Here is one such implementation:

public static Task ForEachAsync(IEnumerable<Func<Task>> tasks)
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();

    Task currentTask = Task.FromResult(false);

    foreach (Func<Task> function in tasks)
    {
        currentTask.ContinueWith(t => tcs.TrySetException(t.Exception.InnerExceptions)
            , TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
        currentTask.ContinueWith(t => tcs.TrySetCanceled()
                , TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnCanceled);
        Task<Task> continuation = currentTask.ContinueWith(t => function()
            , TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
        currentTask = continuation.Unwrap();
    }

    currentTask.ContinueWith(t => tcs.TrySetException(t.Exception.InnerExceptions)
            , TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
    currentTask.ContinueWith(t => tcs.TrySetCanceled()
            , TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnCanceled);
    currentTask.ContinueWith(t => tcs.TrySetResult(true)
            , TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);

    return tcs.Task;
}

I added in support for canceled tasks as well, just to be more general and because it took so little to do.

It adds each task as a continuation of the previous task, and all along the line it ensures that any exceptions result in the final task's exception being set.

Here is an example usage:

public static Task FooAsync()
{
    Console.WriteLine("Started Foo");
    return Task.Delay(1000)
        .ContinueWith(t => Console.WriteLine("Finished Foo"));
}

public static Task BarAsync()
{
    return Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { throw new Exception(); });
}

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<Func<Task>> list = new List<Func<Task>>();

    list.Add(() => FooAsync());
    list.Add(() => FooAsync());
    list.Add(() => FooAsync());
    list.Add(() => FooAsync());
    list.Add(() => BarAsync());

    Task task = ForEachAsync(list);

    task.ContinueWith(t => Console.WriteLine(t.Exception.ToString())
        , TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
    task.ContinueWith(t => Console.WriteLine("Done!")
        , TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
}
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