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How does one add let's say [someVal,someVal] after every nth element in array

so for example let's say I have

p = [0,1,2,3,4,5]

Now I want to insert [9,9] something after every 2 element so my result should be

ans = [0 1 9 9 2 3 9 9 4 5 9 9]

and if you have

p = [1,2,3]

then you should end up with

p = [1 2 9 9 3]

I would like to know how would approach this, and it would be great if you could show me where should I look, since I'm new to MatLab.

Thanks for your time.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a vectorized solution for inserting vector q into vector p after every n elements:

N = numel(p);
M = mod(N, n);
p_pad = [p(:); zeros((n - M) * (M > 0), 1)];
res = [reshape(p_pad, n, []); repmat(q(:), 1, numel(p_pad) / n)];
res = res(1:N + numel(q) * fix(N / n));

You can retain the input vector row/column property for the output by adding the following:

if isrow(p)
    res = res';
end

Explanation

It's easiest to explain this with an example. We start out with vector p, and we want to reshape it into an matrix, each column having n elements. If the number of elements in p is not a multiple of n, we'll need to "pad" it (say, with zeroes). For example, for p = [1 2 3 4 5 6 7], n = 3, we'll reshape p to the following matrix:

1    4    7
2    5    0
3    6    0

Now we use repmat to replicate vector q and generate another matrix with the same number of columns, where each column is q:

9    9    9
9    9    9

Then we concatenate these two matrices vertically (in my code the new matrix is called res):

1    4    7
2    5    0
3    6    0
9    9    9
9    9    9

And after we turn this matrix into a vector once again, concatenating column together, we should get the desired result. Note that we also want to discard the trailing 0 0 9 9 (that formed due to the padding), so let's compute the expected amount of elements L in the result:

L = N + length(q) * fix(N / n)

and then extract we'll just extract the first L elements from our res.

It's usually easiest to operate on columns because MATLAB's linear indexing is column-major.

Examples

Let's put this into a function:

function y = insertn(p, q, n)
    N = numel(p);
    p_pad = [p(:); zeros((n - mod(N, n)) * (mod(N, n) > 0), 1)];
    y = [reshape(p_pad, n, []); repmat(q(:), 1, numel(p_pad) / n)];
    y = y(1:N + numel(q) * fix(N / n));

    if isrow(p)
        y = y';
    end 

Now let's test it for different inputs:

>> insertn(0:5, [9 9], 2)
ans =
    0    1    9    9    2    3    9    9    4    5    9    9

>> insertn(1:3, [9 9], 2)
ans =
    1    2    9    9    3

>> insertn(1:7, [9 9], 3)
ans =
    1    2    3    9    9    4    5    6    9    9    7
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1  
Thanks man ! This really Helped ! –  user1971993 Feb 1 '13 at 17:36
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Here is one way to do this:

p = 1:5;
x=[];
for i=1:2:numel(p)-1
   x=[x p(i:i+1) [9 9]]; 
end
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Untill now I see the solutions given try to add [9 9] in the right place.

Here is a solution that looks at things from a different perspective. Rather than putting the padding vector in your original vector, it creates a background filled with 9 and inserts the vector in the right spots.

I did not test it but it should be quite efficient:

p = 0:5; %Suppose this is your vector
N = length(p);
v = zeros(N+2*floor(N/2),1)+9; %Start with the `background` of the right size
v(1:4:end) = p(1:2:end);
v(2:4:end) = p(2:2:end); 
v'

Note that this solution is easily expanded to the case where P is a matrix, you can just add one dimension everywhere.

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