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I'm trying to specialize Outer<P>::Inner on the type P as shown below and it appears to work (on gcc 4.5.3 and Visual Studio 2008), until a member variable Inner i is declared in Outer<P>. Is it there a way to declare Inner i without specializing Outer<P>?

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
struct Outer
{
    Outer()
    {
        Inner();
    }

    struct Inner;   
    //Inner i;      // compilation error
};

template<>
struct Outer<bool>::Inner
{
    Inner()
    {
        std::cout << "Specialization ..." << std::endl;
    }
};

template<typename T>
struct Outer<T>::Inner
{
    Inner()
    {
        std::cout << "Generic version ..." << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Outer<char> o2;
    Outer<bool> o1;
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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2 Answers 2

Specialisations have to be done at namespace level. So the easiest way to do this is declaring Inner at namespace level:

template <typename T>
struct Outer_Inner
{
  Outer_Inner()
  {
    std::cout << "Generic version ..." << std::endl;
  }
};

template <>
struct Outer_Inner<bool>
{
  Outer_Inner()
  {
    std::cout << "Specialization ..." << std::endl;
  }
};


template<typename T>
struct Outer
{
  Outer() : i()
  {
  }

  Outer_Inner<T> i;      // no error anymore
};

In C++11 there's a workaround to get everything defined inside the class, but I wouldn't recommend it.

template<typename T>
struct Outer
{
  Outer() : i()
  {
  }

  struct generic_inner
  {
    generic_inner()
    {
      std::cout << "Generic version ..." << std::endl;
    }
  };

  struct special_inner
  {
    special_inner()
    {
      std::cout << "Specialization ..." << std::endl;
    }
  };

  typename std::conditional<std::is_same<T, bool>::value,
                            special_inner, generic_inner>::type i;
};
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Thanks. I was hoping to have the inner class Inner access the members of Outer<T>, without using the friend keyword. –  Olumide Jan 31 '13 at 17:42
2  
@Olumide: What is the problem with the friend keyword? Whether it is an inner type or a friend, the coupling is just as tight. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 31 '13 at 17:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Making i a (shared) pointer seems to work

template<typename T>
struct Outer
{
    Outer() : i( new Inner() )
    {
    }

    struct Inner;   
    boost::shared_ptr<Inner> i;
};

Here's what I think is going on. In the original code Inner is declared after Outer, as it should. Therefore the size of i is not known when it is declared. In the above snippet i is a pointer and its size is known even though Inner is yet to be defined.

Specializing Inner inside Outer, before declaring i, "works" in Visual Studio 2008 but fails in gcc 4.5.3, as it should, because the standard forbids it.

However the standard allows partial specialization in class scope. This makes it possible to have a non-pointer member i albeit templated on a a dummy parameter T2=T1, as shown below, although I think I'll go with the (smart) pointer version.

template<typename T1>
struct Outer
{
    template<typename T2,bool>
    struct Inner; 

    template<typename T2>
    struct Inner<T2,true>
    {
        Inner()
        {
            std::cout << "# Specialization ..." << std::endl;
        }
    };

    template<typename T2>
    struct Inner<T2,false>
    {
        Inner()
        {
            std::cout << "# Generic version ..." << std::endl;
        }
    };  

    Outer()
    {
    }

    Inner<T1,boost::is_same<T1, bool>::value> i;
};
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