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See this html

<div>
    <p>
    <span class="abc">Monitor</span> <b>$300</b>
    </p>
    <a href="/add">Add to cart</a>
</div>
<div>
    <p>
    <span class="abc">Keyboard</span> $20 
    </p>
    <a href="/add">Add to cart</a>
</div>

Using xpath I want to parse Monitor $300 and Keyboard $20. I use this xpath

 //div[a[contains(., "Add to cart")]]/p/text()

But it selects <span class="abc">Monitor</span> <b>$300</b>. I dont want the tags. how do Get only the text?

share|improve this question
    
text() should never select elements. What XML parser are you using? –  choroba Jan 31 '13 at 17:30
    
@choroba scrapy.selector.lxmlsel.HtmlXPathSelector –  Genghis Khan Jan 31 '13 at 17:32
    
How do you access the value? In the DOM Level 3 word you would select the p elements with e.g. //div[a[contains(., "Add to cart")]]/p and then access the textContent property to get plain text contents. –  Martin Honnen Jan 31 '13 at 17:32
    
@MartinHonnen I am using XPathSelector –  Genghis Khan Jan 31 '13 at 17:36
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You want to select all descendant text, not just child text:

//div[a[contains(., "Add to cart")]]/p//text()

Note the double slash between p and text() there.

This potentially will also include a lot of inter-tag whitespace though, you you'll need to clean that up. Example using lxml:

>>> import lxml.etree as ET
>>> tree = ET.fromstring('''<div>
... <div>
...     <p>
...     <span class="abc">Monitor</span> <b>$300</b>
...     </p>
...     <a href="/add">Add to cart</a>
... </div>
... <div>
...     <p>
...     <span class="abc">Keyboard</span> $20 
...     </p>
...     <a href="/add">Add to cart</a>
... </div>
... </div>''')
>>> tree.xpath('//div[a[contains(., "Add to cart")]]/p//text()')
['\n    ', 'Monitor', ' ', '$300', '\n    ', '\n    ', 'Keyboard', ' $20 \n    ']
>>> res = _
>>> [txt.strip() for txt in res if txt.strip()]
['Monitor', '$300', 'Keyboard', '$20']
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! that double // saves my day –  Genghis Khan Jan 31 '13 at 17:40
    
I use the exact same code to remove white spaces though. –  Genghis Khan Jan 31 '13 at 17:41
    
Glad that worked for you. :-) I was just making sure you understand where the whitespace comes from and how to clean it up. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 31 '13 at 17:43
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