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I am trying to create a multi-dimensional histogram using multi-dimentional vectors and I don't know the dimension size ahead of time. Any ideas on how to do this in c++?

Mustafa

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what have you tried? – thang Jan 31 '13 at 18:40
    
"I don't know the dimension size ahead of time" - do you mean you don't know it when you write your code, or do you mean that it could change at runtime after it's instantiated? – us2012 Jan 31 '13 at 18:42
    
he doesn't know – thang Jan 31 '13 at 18:44
    
Did you have a look at Boost Multidimensional Array ? – Nobody Jan 31 '13 at 19:18
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Write your own class. For starters, you'll probably want something along the lines of:

class MultiDimVector
{
    std::vector<int> myDims;
    std::vector<double> myData;
public:
    MultiDimVector( std::vector<int> dims )
        : myDims( dims )
        , myData( std::accumulate( 
            dims.begin(), dims.end(), 1.0, std::multiplies<int>() )
    {
    }
};

For indexing, you'll have to take an std::vector<int> as the index, and calculate it yourself. Basically something along the lines of:

int MultiDimVector::calculateIndex(
    std::vector<int> const& indexes ) const
{
    int results = 0;
    assert( indexes.size() == myDims.size() );
    for ( int i = 0; i != indexes.size(); ++ i ) {
        assert( indexes[i] < myDims[i] );
        results = myDims[i] * results + indexes[i];
    }
    return results;
}
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You can use std::vector, like:

std::vector<std::vector<yourType> >

(or maybe if you use a framework you can search it's documentation for a better integrated array replacement ;) )

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How does that solve his problem. It's an error prone and poorly performing substitute for a 2 dimensional vector; it doesn't support more than 2 dimensions, and it doesn't enforce the requirement that each row have the same length. – James Kanze Jan 31 '13 at 18:35

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