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.Net Framework version: 3.5

I have a program that processes all exceptions that can be generated. This results in a large number of catch blocks, many of which are duplicates from one method to another. I would like to collect all of the catch processing into a single method. For example:

string catch_processing ( Exception  e )
    {

    }

In this example, the method would return the e.Message and the e.StackTrace and any other information that was pertinent. It's that "other information" that is my problem. I want to differentiate between exceptions, something like

switch ( e )
    {
    case PathTooLongException:
        :
        break;

    case DirectoryNotFoundException:
        :
        break;

    default:
        :
        break;
    }

I'm not sure how to implement this method and would appreciate some guidance.

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4  
It's not clear to me what you're asking for, but it sounds like you're doing something wrong if you have that many catch blocks. You should only catch exceptions that you can handle. –  Brian Rasmussen Jan 31 '13 at 17:36
    
You can always just rethrow e and catch and handle it inside CatchProcessing() to distinguish the type. (It's ugly, but if you're bent on this approach, why not.) That said, this might clobber the stack trace, so you might want to handle that before. –  millimoose Jan 31 '13 at 17:37
    
@brian The program requires that all exceptions be reported, whether or not they are handled. –  Gus Jan 31 '13 at 17:39
1  
Even if that is the case, there's no reason to catch exception in all methods. –  Brian Rasmussen Jan 31 '13 at 17:42
1  
@Gaus That's what I meant. You can rethrow the e parameter like: try { throw e; } catch PathTooLongException {...} ... - and make use of how try..catch matches the exception to the type. –  millimoose Jan 31 '13 at 18:11
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5 Answers

If reporting the exception is your only goal, you could perhaps try out the following

public class Foo
{
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
     var domain = AppDomain.CurrentDomain;
     domain.FirstChanceException += new EventHandler<FirstChanceExceptionEventArgs>(CurrentDomain_FirstChanceException);
  }

   static void CurrentDomain_FirstChanceException(object sender, FirstChanceExceptionEventArgs args)
    {
       //If you are not putting this inside a try finally block then this would become an infinite recursion.
        try
        {
            var actualException = args.Exception;
            Console.WriteLine(actualException.ToString());
            //Do whatever with actualException

        }
        finally
        {

        }
    }
}
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I just mentioned it inside main for the sake of explaining. put that piece of code in an appropriate place where the application initialization happens. –  Soundararajan Jan 31 '13 at 18:38
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A TryCatchLog static method was posted to CodeReview that does what I think you're trying to do; exceptionSubscriber.TryCatchLog(Statements...) would catch any exceptions thrown by Statements..., log them to exceptionSubscriber, and rethrow.

Before you copy that code, however, stop and explain what you are trying to accomplish. "The program requires that all exceptions be reported" is a very suspicious statement since the runtime will already report unhandled exceptions without you doing anything. Another very suspicious thing is that there are no throw statements in your catch_processing.

You're not trying to continue after any exception has been thrown, are you? Take it from a veteran of the ON ERROR GOTO days that is a mistake; programs that try to continue after an exception have a tendency to fail and be very hard to debug. They will throw an exception, keep going, show wrong results, keep going, corrupt data, keep going, then start a cascade of errors which all get logged, keep going, fill your disk, keep going, lock up machines, keep going, until they finally go into an infinite loop. Have fun debugging that.

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Use instanceof to determine what type of exception it is. Like others have commented, I think you need to rethink your exception handling strategy.

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The program requires that all exceptions be reported, whether or not they are handled –  Gus Jan 31 '13 at 18:57
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You don't really need any of that:

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += SomeExceptionHandler;

is going to handle any and all exceptions that occur in the AppDomain scope (which is basically the entire application if you're not dealing with multiple AppDomains.

Then, instead of trying to obtain the Exception type in a strongly-typed manner (such as casting to "System.XXXXException or "System.YYYYException"), use Reflection to obtain the whole object graph of the exception objects and you can log that (or do whatever error reporting you want).

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

After @Soundarajan, I've implemented the answer as:

    static string catch_processing ( Exception  e )
        {
        StringBuilder   sb = new StringBuilder ( );

        try 
            { 
            throw e; 
            } 
        catch ( PathTooLongException )
            {
            sb.Append (
                "Supplied path is longer than the system-" +
                "defined maximum length" );
            }
        catch ( ArgumentException )
            {
            sb.Append (
                "Supplied path contains invalid characters, " +
                "is empty, or contains only white spaces" );
            }
        catch ( UnauthorizedAccessException )
            {
            sb.Append (
                "The caller does not have the " +
                "required permission" );
            }
        : other catch blocks

        sb.AppendFormat ( "{0}{1}{2}{3}",
                          Environment.NewLine,
                          e.Message,
                          Environment.NewLine,
                          e.StackTrace );

        return ( sb.ToString ( ) );
        }
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