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So I've got a triangle:

And I've got a vertex shader:

uniform mat4 uViewProjection;
attribute vec3 aVertexPosition;
attribute vec2 aTextureCoords;
varying vec2 vTextureCoords;

void main(void) {
  vTextureCoords = aTextureCoords;
  gl_Position = uViewProjection * vec4(aVertexPosition, 1.0);
}

And I've got a fragment shader:

precision mediump float;
uniform sampler2D uMyTexture;
varying vec2 vTextureCoords;

void main(void) {
  gl_FragColor = texture2D(uMyTexture, vTextureCoords);
}

And I feed in three sets of vertices and UVs, interleaved:

# x,  y,    z,   s,   t
0.0,  1.0,  0.0, 0.5, 1.0
-1.0, -1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0 
1.0, -1.0,  0.0, 1.0, 0.0

How does the fragment shader know to draw pixel A differently from pixel B? What changes?

share|improve this question
    
You fed in a texture right? Why would you expect them to be the same or are you asking how shaders work on the GPU? –  Jesus Ramos Jan 31 '13 at 18:53
    
@JesusRamos I'm asking how shaders work. I don't understand what's changing and who's changing it between shader passes. –  a paid nerd Jan 31 '13 at 19:02
    
Check out @genpfault's answer. I was going to say the same thing but he beat me to it :) –  Jesus Ramos Jan 31 '13 at 19:08
1  
Check this great answer stackoverflow.com/q/14246604/187752, when OpenGL might be sampling values you are not expecting. –  Kimi Feb 1 '13 at 8:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As I understand it the rasterization stage of the GL pipeline interpolates vTextureCoords across the triangle face, running the fragment shader on each pixel with the interpolated value.

share|improve this answer
    
Very good explanation. Couldn't have said it better myself. –  Jesus Ramos Jan 31 '13 at 19:07
    
So vTextureCoords changes? Do all varying variables get changed somehow? –  a paid nerd Jan 31 '13 at 19:11
    
Yep, all varyings in the fragment shader are loaded with interpolated values. –  genpfault Jan 31 '13 at 19:29
3  
A further explanation of this answer, along with animation, is available here: greggman.github.com/webgl-fundamentals/webgl/lessons/… –  a paid nerd Jan 31 '13 at 19:55

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