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Slight issue. (Not using toupper() and tolower() functions) I understand what converting to uppercase and lowercase using numerical values is but following my C++ book, why is the conversion at the end of this statement and not before?:

if (letter >= 'A')  //test for 'A' or larger
    if (letter <= 'Z')  //test for 'Z' or smaller
    {
        cout << endl
             << "You entered a capital letter."
             << endl;
        letter += 'a' - 'A'; //Convert to lowercase
        return 0;
    }

if (letter >= 'a') //test for 'a' or larger
{
    if (letter <= 'z') //test for 'z' or smaller
    {
    cout << endl
         << "You entered a small letter."
         << endl;

    return 0;
    }
}

Why would it convert the uppercase to lowercase at this point of code execution since the second if statement deals with lowercase input?

share|improve this question
    
In this day and age, this kind of conversion should be banned. –  Alex Chamberlain Jan 31 '13 at 19:26
    
@AndyProwl Why? 'a' - 'A' is a constant. There'd be no point in assigning a constant to the letter. += converts to lowercase with this technique. –  user529758 Jan 31 '13 at 19:28
2  
Careful: char may be either signed or unsigned. 'a'-'A' may underflow if unsigned type. –  Loki Astari Jan 31 '13 at 19:44
3  
@H2CO3 - += converts to lowercase if the system uses ASCII to encode characters and the code only has to deal with characters in the English alphabet. As soon as you add accented characters into the mix, or, heaven forbid, Cyrillic or Greek, this code will fail. –  Pete Becker Jan 31 '13 at 19:44
    
@PeteBecker you think I don't know that? My goal was to point out that (assuming ASCII) it should be += and not =... –  user529758 Jan 31 '13 at 19:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why would it convert the uppercase to lowercase at this point of code execution since the second if statement deals with lowercase input?

That is because

return 0

means that the function is finished. The lines

if (letter >= 'a') //test for 'a' or larger
{
    if (letter <= 'z') //test for 'z' or smaller
    {
    cout << endl
         << "You entered a small letter."
         << endl;

    return 0;
    }
}

will not be executed if letter was originally an upper case letter. It would print out "You entered a capital letter.", then convert it to lower case, then exit.

why is the conversion at the end of this statement and not before?

It would make no difference if the conversion were before the cout statement.

share|improve this answer

The given snippet could be the body of the function:

int convert(char& letter)
{
    if (letter >= 'A' && letter <= 'Z')
    {
        letter += 'a' - 'A';
        return 0; // go out of this function...
    }
    else if (letter >= 'a' && letter <= 'z')
    {
        letter += 'A' - 'a';
        return 0; // go out of this function...
    }
    return -1; // it wasn't a letter as we expected
}

Note, that there's a possible path that doesn't match none of these 2 situation. Let's say that letter is '?', since you're returning int value, there should be an indication that something is wrong (it's up to you how you deal with error handling).

Possible usage of your this function could look like this:

char letter = '!';
if (convert(letter) == 0)
    // success ...
else
    // error ...

If the question is really about leaving the scope of function, then this question could be helpful too:
How to break out of a function


Concrete example:

void convertLetterAndPrintResult(char& letter)
{
    if (convert(letter) == 0)
        std::cout << letter << std::endl;
    else
        std::cout << "ERROR: '" << letter << "' is not valid character!" << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    char letter = '!';
    convertLetterAndPrintResult(letter);
    letter = 'g';
    convertLetterAndPrintResult(letter);
    letter = 'L';
    convertLetterAndPrintResult(letter);
}

Output:

ERROR: '!' is not valid character!
G
l
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. That question is also helpful and will be looking back at it when I get to the stage of breaking out of functions. However, my question was, in a nutshell, why convert uppercase to lowercase before the return statement. But I am sort of starting to get a grip on it. –  wilbomc Jan 31 '13 at 20:52

Because there's a return 0; statement in the first part. If the original character was uppercase, the control flow doesn't even reach the second nested if () { if () { } } part.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that but in that scenario would it not be better to check and convert the letter characters before hand? It just doesn't make sense to me why one would convert to lowercase right before return ends the operation. –  wilbomc Jan 31 '13 at 20:24
    
@wilbomc: return doesn't terminate program's execution, it just makes the execution to leave the function that has been called and to pass the returned value to the caller. Check my answer now :) –  LihO Jan 31 '13 at 20:44
    
I thought return basically returned control of a program to the operating system thus ending it. But I am still in early days learning C++. So return is basically returning the lowercase value? –  wilbomc Jan 31 '13 at 20:49
    
@wilbomc Read that C++ turorial again :) return 0; simply returns 0. Nothing more, nothing less. –  user529758 Jan 31 '13 at 20:50
    
I re-read the tutorial. I am now under the impression the author was simply showing a way to convert to lowercase and uppercase but wrote it in a confusing manner as, I guess (might be wrong), there is no need for the lowercase conversion in the first place, at least in the example I wrote. The conversion would be better of validating user input in my opinion. But I'm just a beginner. –  wilbomc Jan 31 '13 at 21:13

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