Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm using the below implementation to stop a thread in Tomcat. The code works, but I'm wondering two things:

  1. Is it necessary to have Thread.sleep() in the try statement of MyConsumer.java?
  2. Instead of checking for my boolean flag, running, should I remove the concept of a flag and just check for while(!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted)?

ServletContextListener:

public final class ApplicationListener implements ServletContextListener {

    private Thread thread = null;
    private MyConsumer k = null;

    public ApplicationListener() {
    }

    @Override
    public void contextInitialized(ServletContextEvent event) {

        k = new MyConsumer();
        thread = new Thread(k);

        thread.start();

    }

    @Override
    public void contextDestroyed(ServletContextEvent event) {
        if (thread != null) {
            k.terminate();
            try {
                thread.join();
            } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                Logger.getLogger(ApplicationListener.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            }
        }
    }
}

MyConsumer.java:

public class MyConsumer implements Runnable {

    private volatile boolean running = true;

    public MyConsumer() {
    }

    public void terminate() {
        running = false;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {

            while (running) {

                try {

                    doStuff();
                    Thread.sleep((long) 1000);

                } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                    Logger.getLogger(MyConsumer.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
                    running = false;
                }
            }

    }
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is it necessary to have Thread.sleep() in the try statement of MyConsumer.java

No. The sleep call, I presume, is there to make sure that doStuff() is executed with an interval of 1 second between every invocation, rather than executed continuously. If you want this 1 second interval, you need to leave the sleep call there. If you want doStuff() to be executed continuously, then you need to remove the sleep.

Instead of checking for my boolean flag, running, should I remove the concept of a flag and just check for while(!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted)?

Yes, that's what I would indeed do. It would remove the need for the flag, and would allow stopping the thread as soon as possible, rather than having to wait for the sleep call to return, after 1 second. The other advantage is that you can check if the thread is interrupted inside the doStuff() method, in case it's a long-running method that you want to stop ASAP.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much. So in my contextDestroyed() I will add a call for thread.interrupt(). Do I still need to call thread.join() before the thread.interrupt()? – littleK Jan 31 '13 at 19:56
    
Also, should thread.interrupt() be called from contextDestroyed(), or from the catch (InterruptedException ex) block in MyConsumer class? – littleK Jan 31 '13 at 20:44
    
In order fot eh InterruptedException to be thrown the thread must be interrupted. So you need to call interrupt() from the contextDestroyed() method. And interrupt asks the thread to interrupt itself, and returns immediately. So you still need to join call if you want to wait for the thread to terminate before returning from contextDestroyed(). – JB Nizet Jan 31 '13 at 21:35
    
Thanks again for your help. – littleK Jan 31 '13 at 23:54

There's no reason for your thread to sleep just to check for interruptions. You can call Thread.interupted() there instead.

Regarding the boolean running flag, it provides similar functionality of interrupted, except that it's not triggered by methods that throw InterruptedException. Depending on whether it makes sense to stop normal flow of operation in those methods, you should use one or the other mechanism, but not both.

See http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/interrupt.html for a good overview of how interrupts are used.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.