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This question is probably a long shot. I can't figure out the errors I'm getting on my core data project when I save after I delete an entity. My .xcdatamodel can be seen at:

http://jump.fm/BXRCG

I have two main entities that I work with, an Outfit and an Article. I can create them with no problem but when I delete them I get the follow error log:

for the Outfit:

2009-09-22 20:17:37.771 itryiton[29027:20b] Operation could not be completed. (Cocoa error 1600.)
2009-09-22 20:17:37.773 itryiton[29027:20b]   {
    NSLocalizedDescription = "Operation could not be completed. (Cocoa error 1600.)";
    NSValidationErrorKey = outfitArticleViewProperties;
    NSValidationErrorObject = <Article: 0x12aa3c0> (entity: Article; id: 0x12b49a0 <x-coredata://7046DA47-FCE1-4E21-8D7B-E532AAC0CC46/Article/p1> ; data: {
    articleID = 2009-09-22 19:05:19 -0400;
    articleImage = 0x12b4de0 <x-coredata://7046DA47-FCE1-4E21-8D7B-E532AAC0CC46/ArticleImage/p1>;
    articleType = nil;
    attributeTitles = "(...not nil..)";
    color = nil;
    comment = nil;
    dateCreated = 2009-09-22 19:05:19 -0400;
    designer = nil;
    imageView = "(...not nil..)";
    location = "(...not nil..)";
    outfitArticleViewProperties =     (
        0x12b50f0 <x-coredata://7046DA47-FCE1-4E21-8D7B-E532AAC0CC46/OutfitArticleViewProperties/p1>
    );
    ownesOrWants = 0;
    pattern = nil;
    price = nil;
    retailer = nil;
    thumbnail = "(...not nil..)";
    washRequirements = nil;
    wearableSeasons = nil;
});
    NSValidationErrorValue =     {(
        <OutfitArticleViewProperties: 0x1215340> (entity: OutfitArticleViewProperties; id: 0x12b50f0 <x-coredata://7046DA47-FCE1-4E21-8D7B-E532AAC0CC46/OutfitArticleViewProperties/p1> ; data: {
    article = 0x12b49a0 <x-coredata://7046DA47-FCE1-4E21-8D7B-E532AAC0CC46/Article/p1>;
    articleViewPropertiesID = nil;
    outfit = nil;
    touch = nil;
    view = "(...not nil..)";
})
    )};
}

And if I delete an Article I get:

2009-09-22 18:58:38.591 itryiton[28655:20b] Operation could not be completed. (Cocoa error 1560.)
2009-09-22 18:58:38.593 itryiton[28655:20b]   DetailedError: {
    NSLocalizedDescription = "Operation could not be completed. (Cocoa error 1600.)";
    NSValidationErrorKey = articleImage;
    NSValidationErrorObject = <Article: 0x12aa340> (entity: Article; id: 0x12b3f10 <x-coredata://05340FA6-B5DC-4646-A5B4-745C828C73C3/Article/p1> ; data: {
    articleID = 2009-09-22 18:58:26 -0400;
    articleImage = 0x12b4d00 <x-coredata://05340FA6-B5DC-4646-A5B4-745C828C73C3/ArticleImage/p1>;
    articleType = nil;
    attributeTitles = "(...not nil..)";
    color = nil;
    comment = nil;
    dateCreated = 2009-09-22 18:58:26 -0400;
    designer = nil;
    imageView = "(...not nil..)";
    location = "(...not nil..)";
    outfitArticleViewProperties =     (
        0x12b5010 <x-coredata://05340FA6-B5DC-4646-A5B4-745C828C73C3/OutfitArticleViewProperties/p1>
    );
    ownesOrWants = 0;
    pattern = nil;
    price = nil;
    retailer = nil;
    thumbnail = "(...not nil..)";
    washRequirements = nil;
    wearableSeasons = nil;
});
    NSValidationErrorValue = <ArticleImage: 0x12ad600> (entity: ArticleImage; id: 0x12b4d00 <x-coredata://05340FA6-B5DC-4646-A5B4-745C828C73C3/ArticleImage/p1> ; data: {
    article = 0x12b3f10 <x-coredata://05340FA6-B5DC-4646-A5B4-745C828C73C3/Article/p1>;
    image = "(...not nil..)";
});
}

A 1600 error is:

NSValidationRelationshipDeniedDeleteError Error code to denote some relationship with delete rule NSDeleteRuleDeny is non-empty.

Available in Mac OS X v10.4 and later.

Declared in CoreDataErrors.h.

But I can't see for the life of me which relationship would be preventing the delete. If some Core Data wizard can see the error of my ways, I would be humbled. But seriously, thank you!

Picture of my model: alt text

FINAL UPDATE: I can't mark this solved, because I didn't really solve it, but I do have a working work-around. In the .m for each of my managedObjects I added a method that looks like:

-(void) deleteFromManangedObjectContext{ 
   self.outfit = nil; 
   self.article = nil; 
   [[self managedObjectContext] deleteObject:self]; 
}

So you can see, first I manually nil out the relationships, and then I have the object delete itself. In other objects, instead of nil-ing, my delete method is called on some of the objects relationships, to get a cascade.

I'm still interested in the "right" answer. But this is the best solution I have, and it does allow for some fine-grained control over how my relationships are deleted.

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1  
UPDATE: I've been doing a lot of experimentation. If I set all of my delete rules to "No Action" then I am able to delete OK. Of course this is not my desired behavior, leaving everything in an inconsistent state. If any of my relation ships are set to either Cascade or Nullify, then I will get the error I posed above. –  SooDesuNe Sep 25 '09 at 2:23
1  
ANOTHER UPDATE: As Alex is indicating, this error is intended to relay that you have a delete rule set to Deny. I don't have any delete rules set as Deny. I've filed a bug report with apple on the mis-reporting of this error. I'll let you know if they respond. That still doesn't explain what's wrong with my model, but the correct error code would definitely help! –  SooDesuNe Sep 29 '09 at 23:06
1  
YET ANOTHER UPDATE: I'm not giving up on this one. I made some modifications to my code, enabling me to delete OutfitArticleViewProperties. The delete rule for both relationships (outfit and article) is Nullify. When I attempt to delete, I get the same errors I was getting before. This poses a really interesting question, if the delete rule is Nullify, how can there be an error? I've not asked it to delete the objects at the end of the relationship, just set the target of the relationship to nil. –  SooDesuNe Oct 7 '09 at 4:15
1  
...Oh, and before you ask, yes the relationship is Optional. –  SooDesuNe Oct 7 '09 at 4:20
    
I appreciate your effort. I have the same issue. I checked all my deleting rules, overridden methods, etc... and problem still persists from time to time. I ended up with the same solution but it is more like 'work around' and is not satisfying at all. –  Lukasz Feb 27 '13 at 8:56
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9 Answers

Do you happen to implement some of the accessor to the relationship yourself? I once had a code like

-(NSSet*)articles
{
       re-calculates properties....
       return [self primitiveValueForKey:@"articles"];
}

in a subclass of NSManagedObject and had a save error. What happened was that, when this object is deleted from the ManagedObjectContext, the CoreData calls the accessor "articles" to deal with the delete propagation. This re-calculation of articles occurred during the delete propagation, which re-surrected the nullified "articles" in my case.

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I needed a breakpoint for a set property at one point and implemented my own set method. That was what made my save crash. Thanks for the tip. –  sanna Aug 26 '11 at 6:40
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I just had the problem of delete fail, and landed on this question. And I've figured out my problem and thought that I'd share that too and maybe someone will have the same problem as well.

The mistake I made is that the object (A) I am trying to delete have a relationship to another object (B) with NULL as delete rule. However, object B also have a relationship to A and it's non-optional. Therefore, when I delete A, B's relationship of A becomes null which is not allowed. When I change the delete rule to cascade and it worked.

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This was the correct answer for me - make sure that the delete rules in your (the reader) xcdatamodeld file is NOT set to the "nullify" if you have the inverse relationships on objects be required. –  strife25 Dec 23 '12 at 21:18
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm answering my own question. Please see: Final Update in the initial question.

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Check your xcdatamodel file for a Deny delete rule. Click on each relationship until you find it. You'll need to change this rule or adjust how you delete managed objects to anticipate the rule's application to the relationship.

share|improve this answer
    
I checked, and all my relationships are either Cascade or Nullify. –  SooDesuNe Sep 23 '09 at 0:53
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I had a similar problem where it turned out the problem was in the .xib file. When I switched on the check box for "Deletes Objects on Remove" (under Bindings->Content Set) of the relevant Array Controller, the problem went away.

Don't know if this will help in your case, but I've had a lot of hairs go gray over problems that turned out be hidden away somewhere inside Interface Builder.

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In my case I have innocently created custom method in my subclass of NSManagedObject: isDeleted. I was encountering strange save exceptions until I removed / renamed it. After losing my sanity, I read documentation again more through-fully this time. It turned out I overridden one of the NSManagedObject methods one MUST NOT OVERRIDE.

Check if this excerpt from docs helps you:

Methods you Must Not Override

NSManagedObject itself customizes many features of NSObject so that managed objects can be properly integrated into the Core Data infrastructure. Core Data relies on NSManagedObject’s implementation of the following methods, which you therefore absolutely must not override: primitiveValueForKey:, setPrimitiveValue:forKey:, isEqual:, hash, superclass, class, self, isProxy, isKindOfClass:, isMemberOfClass:, conformsToProtocol:, respondsToSelector:, managedObjectContext, entity, objectID, isInserted, isUpdated, isDeleted, and isFault, alloc, allocWithZone:, new, instancesRespondToSelector:, instanceMethodForSelector:, methodForSelector:, methodSignatureForSelector:, instanceMethodSignatureForSelector:, or isSubclassOfClass:.

Besides - there are other methods you can override but you MUST CALL super implementation like or call: willAccessPrimitiveForKey, didAccessPrimitiveForKey in accessors and willChangevalueForKey, didChangeValueForKey in setters....

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I recently encountered this error because I had code in the - (void)willSave method which updated some of the properties of the delete managed object after - (BOOL)isDeleted already returned true.

I fixed it by:

- (void)willSave {
    if (![self isDeleted]) {
    //Do stuff...
    }
}
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I was encountering a very similar issue with cascading deletes, on non optional parent-child relationships. It was very confusing because I thought the parent relationship delete rule was set to cascade. It turns out that the data model editor in Xcode was not saving the delete rule. I would set it to Cascade, go to a different view and come back and it would be set to nullify again. I had to restart Xcode and set the delete rule to cascade. After I did this everything worked.

So if anyone else encounters this issue double check that Xcode is saving your delete rules before delving into more complicated solutions.

By the way I'm using core data on iOS with Xcode 5's data model editor.

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Try wait a few seconds between the delete and the save command

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what will this do? –  SooDesuNe Dec 14 '10 at 1:27
    
Why ranking as "not useful"? Have you tried it?? I had the exact problem and when I called the save method after a slight delay, the problem was gone. –  Rizon Dec 14 '10 at 17:17
    
...I personally did it using [self performSelector:@selector(saveStore) withObject:nil afterDelay:0.5]; –  Rizon Dec 14 '10 at 17:20
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