Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building a little js quiz game. With the code below, the user selects an answer and then has to click the answer button to submit, which checks whether the answer was correct. In other words, there's two steps. First, select. Second, submit. I wanted to know if there's a way to eliminate the second step, so that the event's fired on selection.

Here's a fiddle if necessary.

http://jsfiddle.net/mjmitche/D5H9z/

I guess I don't know how to make a general event for all the select boxes that initiates the check, but then, at the same time, is able to inspect the selection to see if it's correct, if that makes any sense.

Note, the game is eventually going to be using something like Underscore templates to insert questions and answer choices into the fields, so if that influences how you'd set things up, please take it into consideration.

Thank you in advance

html

 <fieldset id="question1">
        <legend>What is the answer to this question?</legend>
        <label><input type="radio" name="q1" value="right"> Right answer</label>
        <label><input type="radio" name="q1" value="wrong"> Wrong answer</label>
            <ul>

    </fieldset>

            <input type="button" id="answer">

js

 document.getElementById("answer").onclick = validate;
    function validate() {
            var radios;
            var i;
            var right;
            radios = document.getElementById("question1").getElementsByTagName("input");

            right = false;
            for(i = 0; i < radios.length; i++) {
                    if(radios[i].value == "right" && radios[i].checked == true) {
                          right = true;
                    }
            }

            if(right) {
                    alert("You answered correctly");
            } else {
                    alert("Wrong answer");
            }
    }

Update, the final version of the game will be using Backbone, which supports events like this

events:{ 'click #sayhello': 'validate'
    },

The first two answers to this question proposed an 'inline' solution, but I was hoping for something that would fit in with backbone's event handling. What would I replace #sayhello with in order to trigger the validate function in this code.

share|improve this question
    
If you're using backbone.js, and you want an answer that leverages backbone, why didn't you mention it in your post? Why didn't you tag your question w/ backbone? –  Madbreaks Feb 1 '13 at 0:10
    
the general principle would be the same, with or without the backbone tag, I just wanted to know if there was one selector that I could use to trigger the validate event, without having a specific button that requires including a second step for the user (i.e. select, and then submit) –  BrainLikeADullPencil Feb 1 '13 at 4:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Apply an onclick handler to each radio button:

<input type="radio" name="q1" value="right" onclick="validate">

fiddle here

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I didn't want something inline like this. I updated the OP. Can you suggest what I would put in the place of #sayhello (to trigger the validate function) with the new code I provided –  BrainLikeADullPencil Jan 31 '13 at 21:59

Try this:

<fieldset id="question1">
    <legend>What is the answer to this question?</legend>
    <label><input type="radio" name="q1" value="right" onclick="javascript:check('right')"/> Right answer</label>
    <label><input type="radio" name="q1" value="wrong" onclick="javascript:check('wrong')"/> Wrong answer</label>


<script>
    function check(answer){
        alert(answer+" answer");
    }

</script>

http://jsfiddle.net/D5H9z/3/

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I didn't want something inline like this. I updated the OP. Can you suggest what I would put in the place of #sayhello (to trigger the validate function) with the new code I provided –  BrainLikeADullPencil Jan 31 '13 at 21:59
    
How is this different from my answer, aside from the unnecessary javascript: preceeding the function call? –  Madbreaks Feb 1 '13 at 0:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.