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I am making a GUI component to represent something like a Chess board in a window. Normally it will be a grid of 8x8 squares, although some variants require a 10x8 board etc. The first step is to make a panel that contains a grid of 8x8 components.

The class Board extends JPanel and uses a GridLayout to model a grid of 8x8 components. In an effort to get something done these are simply of class Square which extends JButton. The trouble is that they're not squares!

The Board has been added to a freshly instantiated JFrame, packed and rendered on the screen. Of course, right now the board takes up the entire frame as it is resized by the user. The grid scales with the board and this distorts the squares into rectangles.

This is not entirely undesired behaviour. I would like the board to scale with the frame. However, I would like to ensure that the squares remain square at all times. The board could be rectangular (10x8) but should maintain a fixed proportion.

How do I get square squares?

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I have been purposefully brief. Please let me know if I have been unclear! –  dsclose Jan 31 '13 at 22:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can choose to use a LayoutManager that honors the preferred size of the cells instead. GridLayout will provide a equal amount of the available space to each cell, which doesn't appear to be quite what you want.

For example, something like GridBagLayout

enter image description here

public class TestChessBoard {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TestChessBoard();
    }

    public TestChessBoard() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (Exception ex) {
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame("Test");
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.add(new ChessBoardPane());
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }

    public class ChessBoardPane extends JPanel {

        public ChessBoardPane() {
            int index = 0;
            setLayout(new GridBagLayout());
            GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints();
            for (int row = 0; row < 8; row++) {
                for (int col = 0; col < 8; col++) {
                    Color color = index % 2 == 0 ? Color.BLACK : Color.WHITE;
                    gbc.gridx = col;
                    gbc.gridy = row;
                    add(new Cell(color), gbc);
                    index++;
                }
                index++;
            }
        }

    }

    public class Cell extends JButton {

        public Cell(Color background) {

            setContentAreaFilled(false);
            setBorderPainted(false);
            setBackground(background);
            setOpaque(true);

        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
            return new Dimension(25, 25);
        }

    }

}

Updated with proportional example

Now, if you want to do a proportional layout (so that each cell of the grid remains proportional to the other regardless of the available space), things begin to get ... fun ...

enter image description here

public class TestChessBoard {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TestChessBoard();
    }

    public TestChessBoard() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (Exception ex) {
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame("Test");
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.add(new TestChessBoard.ChessBoardPane());
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }

    public class ChessBoardPane extends JPanel {

        public ChessBoardPane() {
            int index = 0;
            setLayout(new ChessBoardLayoutManager());
            for (int row = 0; row < 8; row++) {
                for (int col = 0; col < 8; col++) {
                    Color color = index % 2 == 0 ? Color.BLACK : Color.WHITE;
                    add(new TestChessBoard.Cell(color), new Point(col, row));
                    index++;
                }
                index++;
            }
        }
    }

    public class Cell extends JButton {

        public Cell(Color background) {

            setContentAreaFilled(false);
            setBorderPainted(false);
            setBackground(background);
            setOpaque(true);

        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
            return new Dimension(25, 25);
        }
    }

    public class ChessBoardLayoutManager implements LayoutManager2 {

        private Map<Point, Component> mapComps;

        public ChessBoardLayoutManager() {
            mapComps = new HashMap<>(25);
        }

        @Override
        public void addLayoutComponent(Component comp, Object constraints) {
            if (constraints instanceof Point) {

                mapComps.put((Point) constraints, comp);

            } else {

                throw new IllegalArgumentException("ChessBoard constraints must be a Point");

            }
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension maximumLayoutSize(Container target) {
            return preferredLayoutSize(target);
        }

        @Override
        public float getLayoutAlignmentX(Container target) {
            return 0.5f;
        }

        @Override
        public float getLayoutAlignmentY(Container target) {
            return 0.5f;
        }

        @Override
        public void invalidateLayout(Container target) {
        }

        @Override
        public void addLayoutComponent(String name, Component comp) {
        }

        @Override
        public void removeLayoutComponent(Component comp) {
            Point[] keys = mapComps.keySet().toArray(new Point[mapComps.size()]);
            for (Point p : keys) {
                if (mapComps.get(p).equals(comp)) {
                    mapComps.remove(p);
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension preferredLayoutSize(Container parent) {
            return new CellGrid(mapComps).getPreferredSize();
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension minimumLayoutSize(Container parent) {
            return preferredLayoutSize(parent);
        }

        @Override
        public void layoutContainer(Container parent) {
            int width = parent.getWidth();
            int height = parent.getHeight();

            int gridSize = Math.min(width, height);

            CellGrid grid = new CellGrid(mapComps);
            int rowCount = grid.getRowCount();
            int columnCount = grid.getColumnCount();

            int cellSize = gridSize / Math.max(rowCount, columnCount);

            int xOffset = (width - (cellSize * columnCount)) / 2;
            int yOffset = (height - (cellSize * rowCount)) / 2;

            Map<Integer, List<CellGrid.Cell>> cellRows = grid.getCellRows();
            for (Integer row : cellRows.keySet()) {
                List<CellGrid.Cell> rows = cellRows.get(row);
                for (CellGrid.Cell cell : rows) {
                    Point p = cell.getPoint();
                    Component comp = cell.getComponent();

                    int x = xOffset + (p.x * cellSize);
                    int y = yOffset + (p.y * cellSize);

                    comp.setLocation(x, y);
                    comp.setSize(cellSize, cellSize);

                }
            }

        }

        public class CellGrid {

            private Dimension prefSize;
            private int cellWidth;
            private int cellHeight;

            private Map<Integer, List<Cell>> mapRows;
            private Map<Integer, List<Cell>> mapCols;

            public CellGrid(Map<Point, Component> mapComps) {
                mapRows = new HashMap<>(25);
                mapCols = new HashMap<>(25);
                for (Point p : mapComps.keySet()) {
                    int row = p.y;
                    int col = p.x;
                    List<Cell> rows = mapRows.get(row);
                    List<Cell> cols = mapCols.get(col);
                    if (rows == null) {
                        rows = new ArrayList<>(25);
                        mapRows.put(row, rows);
                    }
                    if (cols == null) {
                        cols = new ArrayList<>(25);
                        mapCols.put(col, cols);
                    }
                    Cell cell = new Cell(p, mapComps.get(p));
                    rows.add(cell);
                    cols.add(cell);
                }

                int rowCount = mapRows.size();
                int colCount = mapCols.size();

                cellWidth = 0;
                cellHeight = 0;

                for (List<Cell> comps : mapRows.values()) {
                    for (Cell cell : comps) {
                        Component comp = cell.getComponent();
                        cellWidth = Math.max(cellWidth, comp.getPreferredSize().width);
                        cellHeight = Math.max(cellHeight, comp.getPreferredSize().height);
                    }
                }

                int cellSize = Math.max(cellHeight, cellWidth);

                prefSize = new Dimension(cellSize * colCount, cellSize * rowCount);
                System.out.println(prefSize);
            }

            public int getRowCount() {
                return getCellRows().size();
            }

            public int getColumnCount() {
                return getCellColumns().size();
            }

            public Map<Integer, List<Cell>> getCellColumns() {
                return mapCols;
            }

            public Map<Integer, List<Cell>> getCellRows() {
                return mapRows;
            }

            public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
                return prefSize;
            }

            public int getCellHeight() {
                return cellHeight;
            }

            public int getCellWidth() {
                return cellWidth;
            }

            public class Cell {

                private Point point;
                private Component component;

                public Cell(Point p, Component comp) {
                    this.point = p;
                    this.component = comp;
                }

                public Point getPoint() {
                    return point;
                }

                public Component getComponent() {
                    return component;
                }

            }

        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The GridBagLayout works perfectly. What do you think of augmenting the Cell's getPreferredSize() method: Dimension space = getParent().getSize(); int length = (space.width < space.height ? space.width : space.height) / 8; return new Dimension(length, length); –  dsclose Jan 31 '13 at 23:39
1  
I wouldn't calculate the preferred size of a child of it's parent, as the parent is probably trying to determine it's preferred size of the child which could lead to an infinite loop. Normally when queried, the size of both the parent and child are undetermined. I've added another example which demonstrates a way to "grow/shrink" the board on proportion to the available space, check that out ;) –  MadProgrammer Feb 1 '13 at 0:05
    
Beautiful stuff - thanks for sharing :-) –  dsclose Feb 2 '13 at 0:00
    
Trying to get my head around the significance of the number 25 in this code. My current thought is that the layout is based on a squares minimum size? –  dsclose Feb 3 '13 at 1:09
    
I should add that your layout manager compiled first time and it wasn't difficult to plug in the other functionality into my existing code. Thank you :-) –  dsclose Feb 3 '13 at 1:10

This got a bit long, so here is the quick answer: You can't maintain a square board with square squares given your board dimensions (8x8, 10x8) and fully fill the screen if the user can resize it. You should limit the size of the board so that it maintains the aspect ratio even if that means you have some blank space in your frame. OK, read on for the long-winded explanation...

There are two ways you can make this work. Either you can limit the possible sizes of the JFrame, or you can limit the size of your Board so it doesn't always fill the frame. Limiting the size of the board is the more common method, so let's start with that.

Option 1: Limiting the Board

If you are working with a fixed set of board dimensions (8x8, 10x8, and a couple others maybe), and assuming each square has some minimum size (1 pixel squares on a chess board don't sound too practical), there are only so many frame dimensions that the board can fully fill. If your frame is 80pixels by 80pixels, your 8x8 board fits perfectly. But as soon as the user resizes to something like 85x80 you're stuck because you can't fully fill that while maintaining squares with the board dimensions you gave.

In this case you want to leave 5 pixels empty, whether it's 5 above or below, or 2.5 above and below, or whatever, doesn't matter. This should sound familiar - it's an aspect ratio problem and basically why you can get black bars on the edges of your TV depending on TV vs. movie dimensions.

Option 2: Limiting the Frame

If you want the board to always fully fill the frame, probably not what you want, then you have to adjust the size of the frame after a user resizes it. Say you are using a 10x8 board, and the user sets the frame to 107x75. That's not too bad, and with a little math you can figure out 100x80 is your closest aspect ratio that works, and fix the window. It will probably a bit frustrating for the user if the window keeps jumping around on them though, especially if they tried to make it something way off like 50x200.

Last thoughts / Example

Limiting the board is most likely the correct solution. Everything from games to desktop apps follows that principle. Take the ribbon in MS Office products for example. As you make the window larger, the ribbon will expand (maintaining its proportions) until it hits it max size, and then you just get more space for your document. When you make the window smaller the ribbon gets smaller (again maintaining its proportions) until it hits a minimum size and then you start losing parts of it (remember, don't want 1x1 squares on your board).

On the other hand you can prevent the user from resizing the window at all. I'm pretty sure this is how MineSweeper works (don't have it on this computer to double check), and may be a better/easier solution for what you need.

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Thank you! How would I limit the size of the board in this way using a layout manager? Presumably I would need to wrap the board in a panel that caused it to conform to set proportions? –  dsclose Jan 31 '13 at 22:43

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