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grid

I'm trying to create this table layout. Basically the orange 18 you see in the grid means 18% usage between 11am and 12pm on Tuesday. So that's why the hours along the top are best on the edges of the table cell, not in the middle of the cell. That way it's showing the data representing usage over a one hour time range.

I have basically applied a basic hack and right aligned the hours along the top so they kinda look like they're inbetween the cells. This isn't perfect as you can see.

What I want to do is actually have the hours along the top centered nicely between the data cells. I think I could do it with a fixed size column widths, but the table needs to stretch to 100% of the page width and the column widths a percentage. Then it's scalable down to a smaller browser.

Is there a way to do this in HTML and CSS?

Many thanks

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Just use text-align:right for the top rows and text-align:center for the other rows. Looks like that is how it's done in that image. You could add an example html/css for a clearer example though. –  Omega Jan 31 '13 at 22:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To have the first row truly centered between the bottom cells with a single table you can use colspan + widths in percentages without using positioning. That way it will be fluid, it will work with any font, and it won't get screwed when you use 2 digit numbers.

HTML:

<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td>&nbsp;</td>

            <th colspan="2">1</th>

            <th colspan="2">1</th>

            <th colspan="2">1</th>

            <th colspan="2">1</th>

            <th colspan="2">1</th>

            <td>&nbsp;</td>
        </tr>

        <tr>
            <td colspan="2">0</td>

            <td colspan="2">0</td>

            <td colspan="2">0</td>

            <td colspan="2">0</td>

            <td colspan="2">0</td>

            <td colspan="2">0</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

CSS:

table {
    text-align: center;
    width: 70%;    
    }

table td {
    width:8.33%; // 100% divided by (double the number of bottom cells)
}

table th {
    width:16.66%; // 200% divided by (double the number of bottom cells)
}

table td[colspan="2"] {
    background:yellow;
}

table td,
table th {
    outline:1px solid tan;
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/G7KZe/

share|improve this answer
    
I like this, a nice clean mathematical approach. Thank you! Tell me one thing, what is this magical widths:40px; property do? I've never seen that before. –  zuallauz Jan 31 '13 at 23:20
1  
You're welcome. It's leftover from the testing. (I add random chars to properties I want to disable when testing xD ). I will correct the previous post. –  Mario Vlad Jan 31 '13 at 23:23
    
Yeah I tried commenting it out and it still worked, so figured it was probably testing code. Nice. You win the accepted answer for nicest solution, cleanest approach and fluid layout! –  zuallauz Jan 31 '13 at 23:27

You could use position: relative; to place your month numbers to be where you want but it's tricky because table cells often behave weirdly with CSS positioning. And the exact positioning can depend on the font used.

I've come up with a solution that requires 2 tables. The idea is to have one table for the headings, one table for the content. The trick is to have 1 cell less in the headings.

Live example: http://jsfiddle.net/w6TnE/

As you can see, the month numbers are perfectly aligned with the borders. But keep in mind that this setup requires a fixed width, in this case, 60px:

td, th{ border:1px solid #ccc; padding:5px 0; text-align:center; width:60px;}

I just added some additional styling to make it clear.

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Yeah this works nicely thanks! I've awarded the answer to Mario as he came up with a nice way to do it with variable width which my question originally asked for. I'll keep your method in mind next time I need a fixed width method. –  zuallauz Jan 31 '13 at 23:33

You could always wrap each of the table heading text in like a <div> tag and use the css position:relative and left:2px or whatever number of pixels to make it look good.

example

<table>
  <tr>
    <th style="text-align:right;"><div style="position:relative;left:2px;">1</div></th>
  </tr>
</table>
share|improve this answer
    
Why not just style the th? –  Tommy Arnold Jan 31 '13 at 22:26
    
Lets say you have style on the <th> like an underline.. that underline would also be adjusted to left, in which case looks bad. –  Brandon Trecki Jan 31 '13 at 22:32
    
left: 5px; perfect! –  zuallauz Jan 31 '13 at 23:12

You can use an absolutely positioned element inside a relatively positioned element to get the effect you want. The idea is to style the <th> elements with position: relative and then style the hour numbers themselves in an element with position: absolute. You can then position the numbers anywhere you want in relation to the cell.

Here is an example jsfiddle. To adjust the position of the numbers you may want to use a pixel value instead of a percentage for the right property in the th > span block.

For more information, you might want to read about the different positioning methods.

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table td{ text-align:center;}

This will align the text of each cell to the center.

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