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I have the following C# generic class with an indexer:

public class MySpecializedContainer<T> where T : new()
{
    private InternalContainer<Element> container;
    public T this[int index]
    {
        set 
        {
            ConvertTToElement( value, container[index] );
        }
        get
        {
            T obj = new T();
            Element elem = container[index];
            ConvertElementToT( elem, obj );
            return obj;
        }
    }
}

As you can see my class pretends the internal container of Element is a container of T, which will work as long as I can convert Element to T and vice-versa.

The problem I have with this is the following:

The following will work as expected as it will effectively change the actual element in the internal container:

public class MyClass {
   public int a ;
}
MySpecializedContainer<MyClass> container = ...;
MyClass temp = container[18];
temp.a = 5;
container[18] = temp;

but this simpler version will not:

container[18].a = 5;

This will just change the copy that the get accessor has created in the indexer...

Is there any way to make this work ?

Otherwise I have a solution to at least make this statement "container[18].a=5" not compiling but I would really like to support it instead.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
What does ConvertTToElement look like? – doogle Jan 31 '13 at 22:25
1  
Is there a reason you're not using T in your internal collection? – Andrew Cooper Jan 31 '13 at 22:27
    
Your title and question are two different things. – Kimi Jan 31 '13 at 22:28
    
Note that even built in collections in CLR does not provide behavior you want - may be better off blocking behavior (try List<SomeValueType> items and see if you can make sense of error in case of items[3].field = 4; :) ) – Alexei Levenkov Jan 31 '13 at 22:53

You can only really do what you want if there is a reference conversion between Element and T. Then in your indexer you can just pass back the reference to the internal object cast to T.

share|improve this answer

No, it's not possible (without major changes to the way your existing code works).

In order to get this to work the MyClass instance returned would need to be smart enough to know when it's changed and to update the underlying Element when that happens. This isn't possible with a mutable field. If it was a virtual property then you have a shot.

If we modify MyClass like so:

public class MyClass 
{
   public virtual int a {get;set;}
}

Then we can create a special subclass of it within the container:

public class MySpecializedContainer<T> where T : new()
{
    private class MySubClass : MyClass
    {
        private Element wrappedElement;
        public MySubClass(Element wrappedElement)
        {
            this.wrappedElement = wrappedElement;
        }
        public override int a
        {
            set
            {
                base.a = value;
                wrappedElement.Update(value);
            }
        }
    }
}

You'll need to update the ConvertElementToT accordingly as well so that you create a new instance of MySubClass and pass in the appropriate Element object.

So the lesson here is don't use public fields.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Nice example of how one can do that too. In generic case (as OP wanted) one would have to dynamically build proxy class derived from T and wrapping all methods to redirect to inner class... – Alexei Levenkov Jan 31 '13 at 22:50

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