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For a complex web application, one page view might require data of many different types. If you are doing client-side templating and pulling in this data from a RESTful web service, you may have to make a lot of requests to populate the page. Is there any convention by which REST requests can be combined, to receive back a single payload containing all the responses needed?

To use the Stack Exchange User page as an example, you probably would need to call at least these from the Stack Exchange API to build the page:

  • /users/{id}
  • /users/{id}/answers
  • /users/{id}/reputation
  • /users/{id}/tags
  • /users/{id}/questions
  • ...etc

Could the provider of such an API allow you a single request to get all that data? Especially if other root types were involved, say you had to also request /revisions/{id} and /tags to build the page also for some reason.

To be clear, I don't want to know if it's possible to provide such functionality in a web API -- I want to know if there is a standard or at least documented means of doing so.

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I think that might be against REST principles, no? i.e. the unique URI per object representation and its payload. Wouldn't it make things worse? Given that it's not TI calculator but a modern computer capable of parallel HTTP requests verses a single one that'll take as long as the logest of them all.

Don't think there is a standard, but here's an example -- https://developers.facebook.com/docs/reference/api/batch/

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5  
I agree this is getting to be less of an issue, but best practice still seems to be to reduce the number of HTTP requests (developer.yahoo.com/performance/rules.html#num_http). This is why we combine css and javascript files and create image sprites... Thanks for the Facebook link, I was not aware of that – jlarson Jan 31 '13 at 23:00
1  
Yeah, but combining js/css/img and minifying/gziping/spriting them does't quialify as REST, that's just poor man's caching and CDN. – Ilya Kozhevnikov Jan 31 '13 at 23:13
4  
Ilya, of course not, I may not have been clear. What I'm saying is that regardless of the resource being requested (REST or otherwise), we are advised to reduce the number of HTTP requests where possible to improve client performance. – jlarson Jan 31 '13 at 23:18

I think we need some standard way of doing this, but until then, you're probably on your own.

In the past I've had similar challenges when I wanted to do transactions spread across multiple resources. I invented new resources which described the actions I was about to make more clearly (subtracting 5 from account A and adding 5 to account B becomes a transaction with from and to members).

Maybe a similar (but more general) approach could be applied here by using another REST call as container;

POST /batchRequests { requests: [
    { method: 'POST', url: '/resource', payload: { ... } }
], transactional: false }

Which in turn returned a "BatchRequest" object containing results. It's pretty close to what Facebook did as well.

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I know I am very late, but maybe my thoughts could help others...

My solution is a bit different.

I store the resources in a single uri (unified resource identifier) per resource.

User

GET /user => INDEX
PUT /user => CREATE (RETURN LOCATION HEADER)
GET /user/{id} => FIND
POST /user/{id} => UPDATE
DELETE /user/{id} => REMOVE

Messages

GET /user/{id}/message => INDEX
PUT /user/{id}/message => CREATE (RETURN LOCATION HEADER)
GET /user/{id}/message => FIND
POST /user/{id}/message/{id} => UPDATE
DELETE /user/{id}/message/{id} => REMOVE

Friends

GET /user/{id}/friend => INDEX
PUT /user/{id}/friend => CREATE (RETURN LOCATION HEADER)
GET /user/{id}/friend => FIND
POST /user/{id}/friend/{id} => UPDATE
DELETE /user/{id}/friend/{id} => REMOVE

The resulting content-type can get changed through a HTTP-Header, the client needs to specify.

Accept: "application/vnd.com.example.api+json; version: 1.0;"

Currently it is the Accept HTTP-Header field, that tells the server which version and which content type to use.

To keep the browser or proxy cache functionality, i decided to return the Vary HTTP Header field on my api, with all content changing HTTP-Headers in it, so that browsers can correctly differ between resources, by uri and headers.

Vary: "Accept, Accept-Language"

The biggest problem is, how to combine resources to prevent the client from opening too much tcp connections at once.

As example: If you query the user list from my API via /user, the API will return an array of user objects in the desired content-type (JSON,XML,HTML).

I won't go into detail, as there is pagination and filter/search support available to.

Each of the user objects does has dependent resources, like friends and/or messages.

There is a very good structured standard called HAL (Hypertext Application Language) which provides some easy ways to combine a resource with its dependent resources or linked resources. It uses JSON to represent the data.

Have a look at http://stateless.co/hal_specification.html by Mike Kelly.

But that solution also doesn't combine resources in one call, it just sends the uri of the dependent or linked resource with the payload to the client.

This will let the client decide which additional informations to show.

And of course, all the caching functionality, which is very important, is working.

Most of the traffic, when browsing through resources, will be duplicated requests that can be cached very easy.

If u example given want to show the number of friends or number of messages of a user in the user list, think about adding the dependent resource as a key to your result.

Example User Response (JSON)

{
     id: 1,
     email: test@test.com,
     ...
     friends: {
         count: 1,
         _links: [{
             'id': '2',
             'name': 'Peter Parker',
             'uri': '//api.example.com/user/2'
         }]
     },
     messages: {
         count: 1,
         _links: [{
             'id': 'x4gZ6',
             'subject': 'Testmessage',
             'uri': '//api.example.com/user/1/message/x4gZ6'
         }]
     },
     ...
}

Now let's speak about how to prevent the use of multiple TCP Connections!

There is a very simple and good approach for that...

Why not use:

 Connection: "keep-alive"

This will give a client the possibility to query as many resources at once as needed. While all resources are queried via a single TCP connection to the server.

I know there are other concerns with keep-alive connections, so feel free to discuss with me about all the ideas.

Thanks!

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I'm very late to this party, but I've been looking for some lit online on the topic of balancing clean REST design vs the realities of an actual web site. I've found the usual "reduce http requests for performance" but no good essays on good practices with an eye toward tradeoffs. (Commenters feel free to point me in a direction!) And what the hell, no marked answers yet.

Not sure whether you're asking whether it's possible for other people to make your life easier by doing this, or whether you're asking because you are designing an API. Your question says other people so here we go.

Could the provider of such an API allow you a single request to get all that data? Especially if other root types were involved, say you had to also request /revisions/{id} and /tags to build the page also for some reason.

To be clear, I don't want to know if it's possible to provide such functionality in a web API -- I want to know if there is a standard or at least documented means of doing so.

The short version: I haven't seen a lot of good essays on the subject. REST's popularity may be young yet for a good academic consensus-style set of answers. Where I can get away with it, I do what I have to do and I worry less about how pure my design is re: an acronym like REST. But I'd probably err towards a purer standard (again, e.g. REST) implementation if I were the provider for a big, public API (see below).

It's possible, and I've sullied many a pure REST design in my own applications to achieve what I needed in terms of performance. Mainly RPCs or combining resource gets/updates, to minimize the number of HTTP requests, into something a modern Frankenstein web developer might produce.

Could the provider of such an API allow you a single request to get all that data?

Technically s/he certainly could do that. But if I were the publisher of a popular, public-facing API I'd probably use a more "pure" REST approach because simplicity, usability, and maintenance now take on a whole new significance if a lot of strangers will be using it. Performance, for me and for consumers, may be lower priority in this case than it would for an enterprise app for which I'm both consumer and provider.

As usual, the developer must decide the appropriate balance between speed of implementation, clean design, maintainability, performance, and a zillion other things. (That decision already started with choice of language -- Python/Ruby vs Java/C# vs C++ vs...)

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